On Earth-One, Catwoman and Batman were often at odds since they were on different sides of the law, but eventually, Catwoman reformed and Batman accepted her as a vigilante in Gotham City. Coincidentally, Bruce Wayne also started a romantic relationship with Selina Kyle. Despite these developments, Catwoman realized Batman and Bruce could not fully trust her and she left Gotham.
When we were recently counting down the worst things that Batman has ever done, one of the very top spots was devoted to the fact that he allowed Jean-Paul Valley to take over as Batman while he was recovering from a broken back. The reason that it was so particularly egregious is the fact that Batman first met Jean-Paul Valley when Valley was brainwashed into becoming the assassin known as Azrael. Batman helped him defeat his programming, and then took it upon himself to train Jean-Paul as a vigilante, sans the programming.
Bruce Wayne saves the woman from a tentacled creature, and she then nurses him back to health. Just as he passes out, he notices a necklace that has the Batman, Superman and Wonder Woman emblems he drew on the cave, back in the Paleolithic era. He finds himself in Gotham Colony in the Puritan era, where he assumes the identity of the witch-hunter Mordecai and solves a murder, but clashes with the witch-hunting Brother Malleus.

Writers have varied in the approach over the years to the "playboy" aspect of Bruce Wayne's persona. Some writers show his playboy reputation as a manufactured illusion to support his mission as Batman, while others have depicted Bruce Wayne as genuinely enjoying the benefits of being "Gotham's most eligible bachelor". Bruce Wayne has been portrayed as being romantically linked with many women throughout his various incarnations. The most significant relationships occurred with Selina Kyle, who is also Catwoman[109] and Talia al Ghul, as both women gave birth to his biological offsprings, Helena Wayne and Damian Wayne, respectively.
Batman is an expert in interrogation techniques and his intimidating and frightening appearance alone is often all that is needed in getting information from suspects. Despite having the potential to harm his enemies, Batman's most defining characteristic is his strong commitment to justice and his reluctance to take a life. This unyielding moral rectitude has earned him the respect of several heroes in the DC Universe, most notably that of Superman and Wonder Woman.
Villains Amygdala • Anarky • Bane • Black Glove • Black Mask • Black Spider • Blockbuster • Calculator • Calendar Man • Carmine Falcone • Catman • Catwoman • Cavalier • Charlatan • Clayface • Club of Villains • Cluemaster • Copperhead • Court of Owls • Crazy Quilt • Crime Doctor • Crimesmith • David Cain • Deacon Blackfire • Deadshot • Deathstroke • Doctor Death • Doctor Dedalus • Doctor Double X • Doctor Phosphorus • Doctor Hurt • Electrocutioner • Firebug • Firefly • Fright • Great White Shark • Harley Quinn • Hugo Strange • Humpty Dumpty • Hush • Hypnotic • Jane Doe • Jeremiah Arkham • Joe Chill • Joker • Joker's Daughter • KGBeast • Killer Croc • Killer Moth • King Snake • King Tut • Kite-Man • Lady Shiva • League of Assassins • Leviathan • Lew Moxon • Lex Luthor • Lock-Up • Lord Death Man • Mad Hatter • Mad Monk • Magpie • Man-Bat • Maxie Zeus • Merlyn • Mister Freeze • Mister Zsasz • Music Meister • Nocturna • Nyssa Raatko • Owlman • Penguin • Pigeon • Poison Ivy • Professor Pyg • Prometheus • Ra's al Ghul • Ratcatcher • Red Hood • Reverse-Flash • Riddler • Rupert Thorne • Roxy Rocket • Sal Maroni • Scarecrow • Solomon Grundy • Spellbinder • Talia al Ghul • Tally Man • Three Ghosts of Batman • Tony Zucco • Tweedledee and Tweedledum • Two-Face • Ubu • Ventriloquist • White Ghost • Wrath
Back in the 90s comics were prone to some wild publicity stunts to sell issues. The most notable events were the Death of Superman and a villain known as Bane breaking Batman's back. This forced Bruce Wayne to pass the mantle of Batman on to a man named Jean-Paul Valley. Valley ended up going a little crazy. He did not adhere to Batman's rule of "no killing" and made a lot of deadly modifications to the Batsuit. When Wayne got word of Valley's methods and Bane's crime-spree, he went on a spirit journey similar to his first quest to become Batman.
The driving force behind Bruce Wayne's character is his parents' murder and their absence. Bob Kane and Bill Finger discussed Batman's background and decided that "there's nothing more traumatic than having your parents murdered before your eyes".[87] Despite his trauma, he sets his mind on studying to become a scientist[88][89] and to train his body into physical perfection[88][89] to fight crime in Gotham City as Batman, an inspired idea from Wayne's insight into the criminal mind.[88][89]
Batman operates in the fictional Gotham City with assistance from various supporting characters, including his butler Alfred, police commissioner Jim Gordon, and vigilante allies such as Robin. Unlike most superheroes, Batman does not possess any inhuman superpowers. He does, however, possess a genius-level intellect, is a peerless martial artist, and his vast wealth affords him an extraordinary arsenal of weaponry and equipment. A large assortment of villains make up Batman's rogues gallery, including his archenemy, the Joker.

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Jack, failed comedian, failed husband to a murdered wife, reluctantly dons the helmet? becoming the new Red Hood. Red Hood had a large domed red helmet [of course] with one way mirror lenses [like Spider-Man] to see through and a red cape. Oh yes.. he also wore a tuxedo. Very dapper was the Red Hood. While attempting to rob a chemical plant, the plant's security men spot the robbers, shooting the other criminals dead, narrowly missing the Red Hood. Cornered on a catwalk by Batman the [now terrified] Red Hood dives into a chemical basin to make his escape and swims to freedom by way of a venting pipe. He only survived via a special breathing apparatus that was built into his helmet. However, the chemicals in the basin permanently disfigured the an under the hood, turning his hair green, his skin white and his lips red.
While the "New Look" costume was still broad like the Golden Age costume, Adams' version slimmed everything down. He also exaggerated everything, with the bat-ears becoming longer, the scallops on the glove getting longer and, perhaps most importantly, the cape getting longer. This was the costume that Batman would wear for the next two decades. Over the years, artists slightly darkened the colors of the costume, but that seemed to be more a matter of lighting than anything else.

DC Comics' 2005 limited series Identity Crisis reveals that JLA member Zatanna had edited Batman's memories to prevent him from stopping the Justice League from lobotomizing Dr. Light after he raped Sue Dibny. Batman later creates the Brother I satellite surveillance system to watch over and, if necessary, kill the other heroes after he remembered. The revelation of Batman's creation and his tacit responsibility for Blue Beetle's death becomes a driving force in the lead-up to the Infinite Crisis miniseries, which again restructures DC continuity. Batman and a team of superheroes destroy Brother Eye and the OMACs, though, at the very end, Batman reaches his apparent breaking point when Alexander Luthor Jr. seriously wounds Nightwing. Picking up a gun, Batman nearly shoots Luthor in order to avenge his former sidekick, until Wonder Woman convinces him to not pull the trigger.

Storylines Batman and Son • Batman Eternal • Batman Incorporated • Batman R.I.P. • Batman Reborn • Battle for the Cowl • The Black Mirror • Blind Justice • Cataclysm • Contagion • The Dark Knight Returns • A Death in the Family • Death of the Family • Endgame • Face the Face • Fugitive • Gotham's Most Wanted • Hush • The Killing Joke • Knightfall • Last Rites • Legacy • A Lonely Place of Dying • The Long Halloween • Night of the Owls • No Man's Land • Officer Down • Prodigal • The Resurrection of Ra's al Ghul • The Return of Bruce Wayne • Strange Apparitions • Tales of the Demon • Tower of Babel • Troika • Under the Hood • War Games • Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader? • Where Were You On The Night Batman Was Killed? • Year One • Zero Year
After the introduction of DC Comics' multiverse in the 1960s, DC established that stories from the golden age star the Earth-Two Batman, a character from a parallel world. This version of Batman partners with and marries the reformed Earth-Two Catwoman, Selina Kyle. The two have a daughter, Helena Wayne, who becomes the Huntress. She assumes the position as Gotham's protector along with Dick Grayson, the Earth-Two Robin, once Bruce Wayne retires to become police commissioner. Wayne holds the position of police commissioner until he is killed during one final adventure as Batman. Batman titles however often ignored that a distinction had been made between the pre-revamp and post-revamp Batmen (since unlike The Flash or Green Lantern, Batman comics had been published without interruption through the 1950s) and would occasionally make reference to stories from the golden age.[132] Nevertheless, details of Batman's history were altered or expanded upon through the decades. Additions include meetings with a future Superman during his youth, his upbringing by his uncle Philip Wayne (introduced in Batman #208, Feb. 1969) after his parents' death, and appearances of his father and himself as prototypical versions of Batman and Robin, respectively.[133][134] In 1980 then-editor Paul Levitz commissioned the Untold Legend of the Batman limited series to thoroughly chronicle Batman's origin and history.
In 2004, an unrelated animated series titled The Batman made its debut with Rino Romano voicing Batman. In 2008, this show was replaced by another animated series, Batman: The Brave and the Bold, featuring Diedrich Bader's voice as Batman. In 2013, a new CGI-animated series titled Beware the Batman made its debut, with Anthony Ruivivar voicing Batman.[170]
Amazo Anti-Monitor Black Adam Black Manta Brainiac Captain Cold Cheetah Darkseid Despero Doctor Destiny Doctor Light Doomsday Eclipso Felix Faust General Wade Eiling Gorilla Grodd Joker Kanjar Ro Key Lex Luthor Libra Maxwell Lord Mongul Neron Professor Ivo Prometheus Queen Bee Queen of Fables Sinestro Starro Steppenwolf T. O. Morrow Vandal Savage Amanda Waller
Another example of a costume design that ended up working better when other artists drew it, if only because they toned down the odder elements of the design, is Jim Lee's design for Batman in the New 52. A lot of Lee's designs for New 52 characters involved the use of armor, even on characters who otherwise wouldn't seem to be prone to wearing armor (like Superman). Lee used a lot of the piping approach of the Batman Incorporated costume, but included it in the armor design and a utility "belt" that was just individual patches on the armor.
Batman’s origin story is the departure point for many different renditions of the character. In initial versions, he’s the inscrutable almost anti-hero, and in others, such as the 1960s television series, he’s a much more levelheaded guy living in a much less corrupt city. The 1960s series leaned heavily on camp, and prompted some to think of killing off the character forever. However, interest in this superhero revived in the 1980s, first with famous graphic novelist Frank Miller’s limited comic book series The Dark Knight Returns and then with the 1989 Tim Burton film. Both Miller and Burton were resolved on dispatching the image of the law-abiding television series superhero to return to his much darker beginnings, though Burton did so with considerable humor.
The 1993 "Knightfall" story arc introduced a new villain, Bane, who critically injures Batman after pushing him to the limits of his endurance. Jean-Paul Valley, known as Azrael, is called upon to wear the Batsuit during Bruce Wayne's convalescence. Writers Doug Moench, Chuck Dixon, and Alan Grant worked on the Batman titles during "Knightfall", and would also contribute to other Batman crossovers throughout the 1990s. 1998's "Cataclysm" storyline served as the precursor to 1999's "No Man's Land", a year-long storyline that ran through all the Batman-related titles dealing with the effects of an earthquake-ravaged Gotham City. At the conclusion of "No Man's Land", O'Neil stepped down as editor and was replaced by Bob Schreck.[59]

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