It's debatable whether Brandon Lee's portrayal of James O'Barr's tragic anti-hero would have gone down in history as quite so legendary if the young actor hadn't lost his life during filming, but The Crow's visual influence can never be denied. Translating O'Barr's striking make-up pattern and leather-clad intensity almost directly off the page, The Crow's look was simply so effective as to be almost shocking.
Not only are they unnecessarily sexualised, they are also extremely impractical in most cases. For instance, why would a female character with no superhuman durability to speak of go into battle with heavily armoured and massively powered opponents wearing what is essentially a bikini? It shouldn't happen, but it does happen in comic books - and it happens a lot. Of course, there are characters whose durability is such that they don't necessarily need to wear full body armour in battle but, even so, revealing 90% of their body is still unnecessary.

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These superhero films and comics have captivating storylines and jokes, which every adult will enjoy viewing or reading through, while the fighting and superhuman abilities will largely appeal to the younger viewers. In addition, some of the most profitable box office films in recent years have been films based on comic book characters and animations - a sign of just how these genres are popular with the masses.


Alba has been called a s.x symbol. She appears on the “Hot 100” section of Maxim and was voted number one on AskMen.com’s list of “99 Most Desirable Women” in 2006, as well as “Sexiest Woman in the World” by FHM in 2007. She played the Marvel Comics character Sue Storm, the Invisible Woman in Fantastic Four. Alba, then appeared in its sequel, in Into the Blue later that year, and Good Luck Chuck a few years later. She look hot in her blue leather bodysuit.

You probably don’t remember the 1974 Sean Connery film “Zardoz.” No one can blame you because the film was a massive flop for the actor. However, the outfit worn by Connery in the film will go down as one of the most ridiculous in cinema history. Coincidentally, that same year, DC Comics decided to debut a new character named Vartox, who looked an awful lot like Sean Connery, probably thinking that sexuality would carry over to comics.


If Nightwing is known for his toned rear, then Power Girl is known for the “boob window.” While the character has a long, storied history in the DC Universe, most readers will only know her by her incredibly silly costume. While there are characters that show more skin than Power Girl, her costume still ranks as one of the most sexualized because of the big hole in the fabric in the middle of her large breasts that serves nothing reason but to show an abundance of cleavage.
Star Sapphire is the name of several characters in DC Comics - most notably Carol Ferris - who often cross the line between being both superheroines and villains. They wear violet-coloured rings that are essentially the same as the green ones worn by Green Lanterns, which provide wielders with powers like flight, energy blasts, the ability to augment their physical statistics and the ability to create powerful constructs of anything they can think of.
Just what is a superhero? Before 1917, there was no such thing; or, at any rate, there was no such word. But there have always been heroes, and some of them have had extraordinary powers or abilities. Ancient mythology has tales of Hercules, Perseus, and Gilgamesh. Medieval folklore has Robin Hood, Beowulf and the knights of King Arthur's Round Table. Then came swashbuckling tales such as The Three Musketeers. The common thread was that the main characters battled against the forces of evil. The evil could take the form of monsters, corrupt or criminal humans, or forces of nature.  

Comic book artists quite often have the same sort of elements pop up in their costume designs. Jim Lee, for instance, is well known for how much he likes to use collars, either high collars or chokers. One of the all-time great costume designers, Dave Cockrum, used so many sashes on his costume designs that he even ended up drawing a cartoon mocking his own overuse of sashes by having a few of his characters pointing out the similarity in their costumes.

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When the great Wallace Wood took over the series early on, he came up with one of the most strikingly simple fixes of a costume in comic book history. He just made the costume red all over and it instantly made it an iconic look. The double-D had already been added before Wood changed the color, but the combination made for a striking costume that comic book artists always seem to eventually default to whenever Daredevil gets a costume change. When it comes to Daredevil costumes, we should always paraphrase Nuke from the classic Daredevil storyline, "Born Again" -- "Gimme a red."

Not only are they unnecessarily sexualised, they are also extremely impractical in most cases. For instance, why would a female character with no superhuman durability to speak of go into battle with heavily armoured and massively powered opponents wearing what is essentially a bikini? It shouldn't happen, but it does happen in comic books - and it happens a lot. Of course, there are characters whose durability is such that they don't necessarily need to wear full body armour in battle but, even so, revealing 90% of their body is still unnecessary.

superhero costume party


By the end of the 1940s, superheroes had lost a lot of their appeal to the public. National Comics (now DC Comics) went from having dozens of superhero titles to only having a handful. Most of the members of the Justice Society of America fell out of sight in the world of National. Flash and Green Lantern went from appearing in multiple titles to not appearing in any books at all!

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