Let’s play a game. Think of one thing about Lady Death other than her looks. Do you know her real name? Do you know her backstory involving witchcraft and her evil father? Statistically, if you're reading this, you probably just know that she has large breasts, hardly any clothes, and each cover has her posing in a suggestive way. The truth is most comic book fans have seen Lady Death, but maybe haven’t read her series. She is one of the prime examples of the excessively sexualized female characters of the ‘90s.
He’s bold, he’s brash, he’s genetically enhanced. He’s Captain America, the patriotic Marvel hero who’s ready to throw down to defeat Nazis, Hydra, or any other threat facing his country. Chris Evans brought Captain America to life in the popular Marvel Universe movies, and Captain America: Civil War took the actions to new heights. He also brought some new threads to the Cap’s look, with a modern take on the classic blue design of his uniform. This boy’s superhero costume will let any little one become the classic American hero. Vivid colors bring to life the polyfoam-molded muscle effects, and printed costume details like the attached foam belt and shoulder straps recreates the movie style in true form. This costume is completed with a vinyl half mask, all he’ll need to do is put it on and practice a very stoic face for all of the photos.
Superman will always be a classic superhero costume, but this cool update based on last year's hit film is worth sporting. This printed fiber-filled jumpsuit has a good sheen on it to look extra slick in your Halloween Instagrams, and it comes with 3D-printed boot tops to complete the look. Our favorite part is the Velcro cape, which you can remove if it starts to be a pest when running around town party-hopping.  
Namor might go down in history as the male hero with the most revealing costume. Wearing only the tiniest green speedo, Namor is the very attractive mutant who rules the seas. He is maybe the very first comic book “bad boy” dating back to his first appearance in 1939. Now, almost 80 years later, he is still known for his sex appeal, in the real world and the fictional world alike.
Vampirella - a vampire (or at least the alien equivalent), if you hadn't already guessed - is a heroic character who came to Earth when her own planet was dying (at least in her original origin story) and, upon her arrival, sought to protect it from the forces of evil. She first appeared on panel way back in 1969 in a self-titled comic strip in Warren Publishing’s black-and-white horror comics magazine and has gone on to appear in comics published by both Harris Publications and Dynamite Entertainment.

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Star Sapphire is the name of several characters in DC Comics - most notably Carol Ferris - who often cross the line between being both superheroines and villains. They wear violet-coloured rings that are essentially the same as the green ones worn by Green Lanterns, which provide wielders with powers like flight, energy blasts, the ability to augment their physical statistics and the ability to create powerful constructs of anything they can think of.

While the X-Men's film uniforms may largely be a snooze, Hugh Jackman's Wolverine is about as dead on as Logan could appear on film. Sure, he donned the same plain black leather as everyone else, but before that, Jackman captured Wolverine's logic defying hair, his old-man sideburns, and even his sneer in a way that comic fans could only dream about.
Jennifer Lawrence, the winner of multiple awards and titles, including an Oscar is a well-known actress for doing challenging yet brilliant roles in the movies. She is also known for her role as Mystique in the X-Men Series. For Jennifer Lawrence to become the hot marvel comics superhero character Mystique, she had some carefully placed prosthetics and complete blue make-up on her otherwise nude body. All three movies in which she played a role of Mystique, was a blockbuster and broke records.

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As noted earlier, patriotic-themed heroes were hot in the early 1940s. America was going through a strange period of both isolationism and nationalism at the same time. Americans were really proud of their country, but also didn't want to get involved in the war in Europe. Patriotic-themed heroes captured that feel, by having noble American heroes defeat villains who dared to come over here to mess with us. Things got bolder, though, when Timely Comics introduced Captain America, who broke out of the isolationist viewpoints by having the lead character punch out Adolf Hitler on the cover of the first issue, a full year before the United States actually went to war with Nazi Germany!


If you talk to many comic book fans that entered puberty in the ‘90s, they might list Gambit as the cause of their sexual awakening. Maybe it was the Cajun accent? Or perhaps it’s the dark, red eyes? Either way, Gambit will go down as one of the all-time sexiest characters in the Marvel Universe. The character is one of the few on this list with a costume that covers almost his entire body, down to just leaving his face and hair exposed. This modesty doesn’t stop Gambit from being a character that’s known for his sex appeal.
And that's saying nothing of the show's villains. Even with Cesar Romero's ubiquitous mustache, you'd be harder pressed to find a more colorful cadre of costumed crooks that so gleefully and shamelessly embodied the campy, all-for-fun spirit of their medium. the 1966 Batman was, in many ways, like a comic ouroboros, with Batman's printed adventures and his television capers influencing each other in equal measure. All of this came full circle when DC Digital launched Batman '66, putting the show's highly stylized aesthetic under the pen of artists like Mike Allred and Ted Naifeh, and proving its enduring value in the process.
In the late 1960s, Marvel wanted to make sure it got control of the name "Captain Marvel" for trademark purposes, so Stan Lee and Gene Colan quickly came up with a character to go with the name. For the costume, creators had him wear a literal Kree captain's uniform, which in this case was a green and white outfit with a little flair to it. It was a decent enough costume for a rank and file character, but it was a weak design for a superhero. Unsurprisingly, the Captain Marvel series was a hard sell for Marvel. Marvel needed to keep it going, though, so the company brought in Roy Thomas and Gil Kane to revamp the series.
In the 1950s, Joe Simon and Jack Kirby, the same guys who brought Timely Captain America, had worked on some comic book ideas in the 1950s and one of them ended up becoming the Fly for Archie Comics. When Stan Lee asked Kirby to come up with a new spider-themed hero, The King of Comics adapted some of the design ideas that he had for the earlier spider hero and used them for Spider-Man, including a gun that shot webs. Lee was not a fan of the look and asked Steve Ditko to try to do a take on Spider-Man. Ditko dropped pretty much every element of Kirby's design, including turning the web gun into webshooters that Spider-Man had on his wrists.
Superman will always be a classic superhero costume, but this cool update based on last year's hit film is worth sporting. This printed fiber-filled jumpsuit has a good sheen on it to look extra slick in your Halloween Instagrams, and it comes with 3D-printed boot tops to complete the look. Our favorite part is the Velcro cape, which you can remove if it starts to be a pest when running around town party-hopping.  
In 1974, Marvel Editor-in-Chief Roy Thomas decided that there should be a Canadian superhero, so he asked Incredible Hulk writer Len Wein to come up with one and either call him the Badger or Wolverine. Wein read up about wolverines and decided to use that name. When the character concept was developed by Wein, Marvel's Art Director, John Romita, was brought in to then give the character a look. Romita essentially designed a costume that made the character look like an animal. That was fine for his first appearance.

Dejah Thoris originally appeared all the way back in 1917 as the princess of the Martian city-state/empire of Helium in Edgar Rice Burroughs's series of Martian novels (the same source that introduced the more well-known John Carter (that guy who got a movie to himself in 2012) - the man who happens to be her husband). Since then, she has appeared in a number of comic books, most notably in Dynamite Entertainment's 2010-11 comic miniseries Warlord of Mars.
Just in case you thought loving comic book characters and superheroes at your age wasn't normal, you will be surprised to find out that even our favorite Hollywood celebrities love them. These celebrities go further to buy costumes, whether for Halloween parties or to attend conventions and appear at parties and such events dressed as their favorite characters.
There have been many injustices in the world of comic books. Heck, the late, great Len Wein got paid more money for creating Lucius Fox than he ever did for creating, you know, Wolverine. So the treatment of H.G. Peter is perhaps not quite as egregious as that faced by other creators, but the simple fact that that guy who came up with Wonder Woman's costume cannot even get a "thanks" in the credits of Wonder Woman is a true shame.

In the 1950s, Joe Simon and Jack Kirby, the same guys who brought Timely Captain America, had worked on some comic book ideas in the 1950s and one of them ended up becoming the Fly for Archie Comics. When Stan Lee asked Kirby to come up with a new spider-themed hero, The King of Comics adapted some of the design ideas that he had for the earlier spider hero and used them for Spider-Man, including a gun that shot webs. Lee was not a fan of the look and asked Steve Ditko to try to do a take on Spider-Man. Ditko dropped pretty much every element of Kirby's design, including turning the web gun into webshooters that Spider-Man had on his wrists.


Just what is a superhero? Before 1917, there was no such thing; or, at any rate, there was no such word. But there have always been heroes, and some of them have had extraordinary powers or abilities. Ancient mythology has tales of Hercules, Perseus, and Gilgamesh. Medieval folklore has Robin Hood, Beowulf and the knights of King Arthur's Round Table. Then came swashbuckling tales such as The Three Musketeers. The common thread was that the main characters battled against the forces of evil. The evil could take the form of monsters, corrupt or criminal humans, or forces of nature.  
You probably don’t remember the 1974 Sean Connery film “Zardoz.” No one can blame you because the film was a massive flop for the actor. However, the outfit worn by Connery in the film will go down as one of the most ridiculous in cinema history. Coincidentally, that same year, DC Comics decided to debut a new character named Vartox, who looked an awful lot like Sean Connery, probably thinking that sexuality would carry over to comics.
And that's saying nothing of the show's villains. Even with Cesar Romero's ubiquitous mustache, you'd be harder pressed to find a more colorful cadre of costumed crooks that so gleefully and shamelessly embodied the campy, all-for-fun spirit of their medium. the 1966 Batman was, in many ways, like a comic ouroboros, with Batman's printed adventures and his television capers influencing each other in equal measure. All of this came full circle when DC Digital launched Batman '66, putting the show's highly stylized aesthetic under the pen of artists like Mike Allred and Ted Naifeh, and proving its enduring value in the process.
Mike Zeck came up with the actual look and it is a stunning piece of design. All black except for the prominent white spider. Rick Leonardi also did some tweaks to the costume and it soon became the most controversial, yet surprisingly popular costume change in comic book history. Fans were aghast at first but then really started to enjoy the new look. Eventually, the design was adapted for the villain Venom, with Spider-Man returning to his classic look. It is popular enough, though, that it still makes occasional comebacks.
It has been proven in the short-lived “Witchblade” TV series and more recent comics that the character of Sara Pezzini can wield the Witchblade without losing her clothes. Unfortunately, most of the comic book version of the character has never really had this as an option. Eventually, without fail, Sara finds herself in a state of undress. When your main character is almost nude throughout the series, it’s not surprising that readers would associate her with her looks instead of her actions.
Debuting in “Cry for Dawn” #1 way back in 1989, the character has only show up sporadically throughout the decades. However, when people think of the hottest female characters in comics, she’ll always rank highly. She is so defined by her looks that Dragon Con held a Dawn look-a-like contest from 1998 to 2010, even when the character wasn’t seen in any recent comic books. Now, don’t think that we are somehow saying that the character isn’t a great character because her looks are so important, but rather that the iconic design by Linsner has allowed the character to live on through the years based on looks alone.
Starfox is actually Eros of Titan, a member of the Eternals and brother to none other than Thanos. Unlike his cranky brother, Eros is much more of a free spirit. He is more concerned with the hedonistic side to life. Thus, when readers think of Starfox, pretty much all you can think about is his sexual history. In one story, in an issue of “She-Hulk,” Starfox is actually put on trial for sexual assault because it’s alleged that he used his powers of seduction to entice a happily married woman. More than any other character on this list, Starfox is rightfully, and admittedly, more of a sexual being than a hero.
As noted earlier, patriotic-themed heroes were hot in the early 1940s. America was going through a strange period of both isolationism and nationalism at the same time. Americans were really proud of their country, but also didn't want to get involved in the war in Europe. Patriotic-themed heroes captured that feel, by having noble American heroes defeat villains who dared to come over here to mess with us. Things got bolder, though, when Timely Comics introduced Captain America, who broke out of the isolationist viewpoints by having the lead character punch out Adolf Hitler on the cover of the first issue, a full year before the United States actually went to war with Nazi Germany!

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