Silly as it may seem, the 1960's Batman TV show had a lot going for it in the costume department. While Adam West's Batman was less a dark knight than a kind of schlubby guy in tights, Burt Ward's Robin was almost a direct translation of the Boy Wonder's classic look, pixie boots and all. Additionally, Yvonne Craig's flashy, sexy Batgirl defined the character's look in a way that is still felt in modern takes on the costume, where it's common place to inject some purple into Batgirl's palette.

Thor, Captain America, and even Hulk and Iron Man all got new looks for Marvel's groundbreaking blockbuster, and while the characters all looked great in their own films, they never looked better than when they finally came together under and unified aesthetic. From Cap's streamlined look, to Hawkeye's subtly comic-influenced S.H.I.E.L.D. garb, the Avengers were most visually powerful as a unit, where their comic book essence was captured nearly flawlessly by pitch-perfect visual cues.


Harley is one of the most entertaining villains Batman has to fight occasionally, second only to the Joker. She is the Joker's lover and partner in crime, although their relationship is weird on so many levels. Harley used to be a normal psychiatric intern in Arkham Asylum, where she met the Joker and then turned into the crazy person she is today.

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Another Detective Comics character, Halle Berry plays Patience Phillips who is murdered and then brought back to life to become Catwoman. The character acquires cat-like abilities and is on a look-out for her murderer in the film. Berry won the Golden Raspberry Award for Worst Actress in 2005 for Catwoman and accepted the award in person, one of few people to do so.
Namor might go down in history as the male hero with the most revealing costume. Wearing only the tiniest green speedo, Namor is the very attractive mutant who rules the seas. He is maybe the very first comic book “bad boy” dating back to his first appearance in 1939. Now, almost 80 years later, he is still known for his sex appeal, in the real world and the fictional world alike.
In 1974, Marvel Editor-in-Chief Roy Thomas decided that there should be a Canadian superhero, so he asked Incredible Hulk writer Len Wein to come up with one and either call him the Badger or Wolverine. Wein read up about wolverines and decided to use that name. When the character concept was developed by Wein, Marvel's Art Director, John Romita, was brought in to then give the character a look. Romita essentially designed a costume that made the character look like an animal. That was fine for his first appearance.
Pretty much every superhero in comic books has a superpower that isn’t really mentioned. Sure, some billionaire genius could, theoretically, learn how to build powerful metal suit and fight crime similar to Iron Man. However, that person still won’t have all the superpowers of Tony Stark. You see, Tony Stark is a ridiculously attractive man. Wonder Woman, in addition to being a badass warrior that could pretty much dominate any foe, is also incredibly beautiful. Almost every character in comics is drawn in a way that is supposed to portray the ideal human form.
Sometimes mutant powers are really just the thing to bring a group together, and if your gang is ready to put their super human abilities to work, then there’s only one team for you: The X-Men! Storm can command the team while Cyclops keeps opponents at bay with his concussive optic blast. If you have a quick-witted member of your group, a Deadpool Halloween costume is sure to turn them into the crass and sharp-tongued Wade Wilson. Up the ante by getting a friend to go in a Wolverine costume, and you’ll have one mutant posse that no villain is going to want to tangle with. We heard Wolvie’s usually hungry though, so you’re going to want to bring plenty of snacks. “Hey. Pass the chip dip, bub!”
Years later, with Wolfman and Wein now working for Marvel Comics, Wolfman brought the character to Marvel's Art Director, John Romita, who took Wolfman's original design and adapted it into the character that would be known as Nova. Romita reduced the starbursts on the chest to three and added a bit of a starburst onto the helmet. Using bold, primary colors, the Nova armor design was often the most notable thing about the character for years. Even as other characters took over the identity as the main Nova at Marvel, the costume itself remained the same, as it was near impossible to improve on that basic design of Romita/Wolfman. If/when Nova shows up in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, you can bet that this is the costume we will see.
Comic book artists quite often have the same sort of elements pop up in their costume designs. Jim Lee, for instance, is well known for how much he likes to use collars, either high collars or chokers. One of the all-time great costume designers, Dave Cockrum, used so many sashes on his costume designs that he even ended up drawing a cartoon mocking his own overuse of sashes by having a few of his characters pointing out the similarity in their costumes.
When Frank Quitely redesigned the character for “New X-Men,” her costume consisted of an impossibly constructed top that had a huge “X” cut out in the front. The exact physics of the costume were never explained, but it’s clear that the artist was trying to emphasize her sexuality. The costume has since been updated, thankfully, but her sex appeal is still front and center, even today. Just searching “Emma Frost” in Google Images shows you exactly how she’s viewed. There aren’t any panels from her appearances in years of comics. Instead, it’s all sexually suggestive pictures.
He’s bold, he’s brash, he’s genetically enhanced. He’s Captain America, the patriotic Marvel hero who’s ready to throw down to defeat Nazis, Hydra, or any other threat facing his country. Chris Evans brought Captain America to life in the popular Marvel Universe movies, and Captain America: Civil War took the actions to new heights. He also brought some new threads to the Cap’s look, with a modern take on the classic blue design of his uniform. This boy’s superhero costume will let any little one become the classic American hero. Vivid colors bring to life the polyfoam-molded muscle effects, and printed costume details like the attached foam belt and shoulder straps recreates the movie style in true form. This costume is completed with a vinyl half mask, all he’ll need to do is put it on and practice a very stoic face for all of the photos.
As noted earlier, patriotic-themed heroes were hot in the early 1940s. America was going through a strange period of both isolationism and nationalism at the same time. Americans were really proud of their country, but also didn't want to get involved in the war in Europe. Patriotic-themed heroes captured that feel, by having noble American heroes defeat villains who dared to come over here to mess with us. Things got bolder, though, when Timely Comics introduced Captain America, who broke out of the isolationist viewpoints by having the lead character punch out Adolf Hitler on the cover of the first issue, a full year before the United States actually went to war with Nazi Germany!

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There have been many injustices in the world of comic books. Heck, the late, great Len Wein got paid more money for creating Lucius Fox than he ever did for creating, you know, Wolverine. So the treatment of H.G. Peter is perhaps not quite as egregious as that faced by other creators, but the simple fact that that guy who came up with Wonder Woman's costume cannot even get a "thanks" in the credits of Wonder Woman is a true shame.
Mike Zeck came up with the actual look and it is a stunning piece of design. All black except for the prominent white spider. Rick Leonardi also did some tweaks to the costume and it soon became the most controversial, yet surprisingly popular costume change in comic book history. Fans were aghast at first but then really started to enjoy the new look. Eventually, the design was adapted for the villain Venom, with Spider-Man returning to his classic look. It is popular enough, though, that it still makes occasional comebacks.

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Alicia Silverstone is an American actress, film and television producer, author, and animal rights and environmental activist. She played the popular comic book character “Batgirl” in Batman and Robin. Although it was not easy for the cute Hollywood actress, who looked oh-so-sexy in the movie. Donning a lycra body suit and high boots, we want to see Batgirl zooming around in her motorcycle more often.
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Not coincidentally, it also featured the best bat-suit yet on film. It may not have looked quite as definitive in close ups as Michael Keaton's outfit, but it moved more fluidly, owing largely to the suit's increased mobility, and especially coupled with its flowing, shadowy cape, cut the best silhouette of any of Batman's onscreen looks -- sorry, Batfleck.
When the Fantastic Four were introduced, Marvel was unsure if it was really prepared to transition from doing science fiction and horror comics to doing superhero comics, so the Fantastic Four originally wore just normal clothes. Even in their second issue, the team is decked out in normal outdoor wear. When the series received a tremendous response from the fans, though, Marvel knew that it had a superhero hit on their hands and so with the third issue, so creators and execs decided to give them costumes. However, they wanted to stick with the basic idea that these were not ordinary superheroes. These were sort of explorers more than traditional superheroes, and as a result, Jack Kirby came up with an awesome sort of utilitarian design for their jumpsuits. Famously, the costumes originally had masks but they decided to drop them.
As we noted in the introduction, when Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster sat down to come up with the very first superhero costume, it is not that they did not have any influences to work with. In fact, it is quite evident that their super-strong hero's initial costume was modeled after the outfit that a circus strongman would wear. However, beyond the powerful primary colors used for the costume -- the blue in Superman's costume is literally the darkest shade of the traditional blue used for comic book coloring -- the costume also evoked a sense of wonder that was so unusual in comics of the time.

There were some slight changes from Ditko's armor to the one featured here, mostly with the face mask, but since those changes were made, that basic design has been fairly consistent. Now, Iron Man's armor has obviously been altered in other ways as technology has changed, but the basic yellow and gold design has been used almost exclusively since then. No matter how fancy the armor gets otherwise, the yellow and gold set-up is a catchy design.

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Jennifer Garner, an actress who is commonly known for her lead role in the television series called ‘Alias’ (2001-2006), had once played “Elektra”. Elektra is a Marvel Comics female superhero character in a movie, which came in 2005. Elektra was a well-trained assassin, who used a pair of sai as weapons. The movie couldn’t do well in the box-office, but sexy Garner as Elektra stole many hearts. Garner has also topped Maxim’s list of the most beautiful women in the world.
Years later, John Byrne revamped the costumes slightly to invert the colors a bit, so that the collars were now white and the blue was tinged with black. It is basically the Kirby design, just with a slight edge to it, so it is our pick for the best Fantastic Four outfits, since the bright blue outfits could sometimes seem to be a bit too bold, color-wise.

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