The gorgeous looking Gal Gadot is the newest female superhero as she was recently introduced in a much-awaited flick ‘Batman Vs Superman: Dawn of Justice as a new Wonder Woman. This film finally brought the sexy female superhero character alive awaited by many fans since long. There has been a lot of discussions to decide who will portray this epic character on the big screen and to which she was finalized and did justice to the character! She is all set to come back in her solo film in 2017.
Here, we will take a look at the very best of the best when it comes to superhero design. Do note that we are working with at least one major caveat, that the superheroes in question have iconic costumes. It does not do you much good to have a really cool costume if no one knows who you are. As a result, we are heavily weighing in the cultural impact of the costume design when we rank them. Where does a costume stand, historically, within the medium itself? That is one of the most important questions that we address when we start our ranking of the best superhero costumes of all-time.

Magneto is, without a doubt, one of the most powerful characters in all the comic universes, since he has the power to stand up against anyone and prevail - even against a god, as we saw in X-Men: Apocalypse. It wouldn't be right to describe Magneto as purely a villain, an anti-hero, or a superhero because we have seen him in all those capacities. However, regardless of what role he is playing, we always find a way of loving him, despite his disgust with human beings and desire for world domination.
Not coincidentally, it also featured the best bat-suit yet on film. It may not have looked quite as definitive in close ups as Michael Keaton's outfit, but it moved more fluidly, owing largely to the suit's increased mobility, and especially coupled with its flowing, shadowy cape, cut the best silhouette of any of Batman's onscreen looks -- sorry, Batfleck.
The 1960s Batman TV series helped to identify the fact that a black leather outfit was her best look, but that did not last too long in the comics themselves. Her most famous costume for years was a tight purple outfit designed by Jim Balent. The late, great Darwyn Cooke, however, came up with this brilliant mixture of a functional,black leather outfit that she wore on the Batman TV series and the film, Batman Returns. The use of the goggle mask was also a great touch. Jim Lee was wary of changing looks during his "Hush" series on Batman, but he adopted the Cooke Catwoman design entirely, that's how good it was.
You don’t have to be a feminist to understand that the superhero game isn’t exclusively for men. Ladies have been busting up the bad guys for years in the pages of the comics, and they’ve started making a splash on the screen in a big way. If you have your eye on women’s superhero costumes , we’re sure you’ll be amazed with our selection. Check out some of these top picks and see if they give you inspiration in making your choice!

Pick a random issue of “Witchblade” prior to the last year or so of its run and you’d be hard-pressed to find a cover that didn’t feature the main character sexualized. Obviously, the biggest reason for the sexual nature of the covers is the fact that the character’s costume is basically the most unrealistic armor ever seen. Basically just enough armor to cover her arm, her nipples and only the bare minimum below the belt, Sara Pezzini’s costume is pretty ridiculous. It’s no surprise when most people would define the character based on her appearance than on her actual heroics.

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Let’s play a game. Think of one thing about Lady Death other than her looks. Do you know her real name? Do you know her backstory involving witchcraft and her evil father? Statistically, if you're reading this, you probably just know that she has large breasts, hardly any clothes, and each cover has her posing in a suggestive way. The truth is most comic book fans have seen Lady Death, but maybe haven’t read her series. She is one of the prime examples of the excessively sexualized female characters of the ‘90s.
If you ask a comic book fan to name the first thing they would say to describe Emma Frost, odds are it’ll be a physical attribute. Emma Frost’s sexuality has been at the forefront of the character since her early appearances. Before she turned hero and became one of the central X-Men, her stint as the White Queen featured the character in very revealing white lingerie. Even when the character joined the good guys, her “assets” were still on display for all to see.
Alison Brie looks amazing in Captain America's costume, and if Marvel were to think of developing a female Captain America, she would be perfect for the role. Brie is an actress and producer, popular for her performance in series such as Community and Mad Men, and in films like Scream 4, The Five-Year Engagement, Get Hard, and How to Be Single, among others. It's interesting how she looks as if she is on the set of The Avengers movie.
Let’s be frank, Nightwing has a great butt. Every person on the face of the Earth, no matter their sexual orientation, would have to agree with that point. There are blogs scattered around the Internet devoted to Nightwing’s derriere, not that we suggest doing those Google searches unless you’re in the privacy of your own home. The real world’s love affair with Dick Grayson’s buttocks has bled over into the fictional universe as well, with characters going so far as to name each of his butt cheeks. Needless to say, Nightwing is definitely deserving of a place on this list.
Like most things in this world, superhero costumes did not just pop into this world out of thin air. There was a long history of costumes that predated them and influenced their creation. There was the colorful armor that knights wore in the Middle Ages. There were the fantastical outfits that some of the characters in pulp fiction novels and adventure comic strips wore. Perhaps most notably, there was the over-the-top attire that circus performers wore in the many traveling shows of the early 20th century. All of these previous ideals helped to influence the direction of superhero costumes in comic book history.
Years later, with Wolfman and Wein now working for Marvel Comics, Wolfman brought the character to Marvel's Art Director, John Romita, who took Wolfman's original design and adapted it into the character that would be known as Nova. Romita reduced the starbursts on the chest to three and added a bit of a starburst onto the helmet. Using bold, primary colors, the Nova armor design was often the most notable thing about the character for years. Even as other characters took over the identity as the main Nova at Marvel, the costume itself remained the same, as it was near impossible to improve on that basic design of Romita/Wolfman. If/when Nova shows up in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, you can bet that this is the costume we will see.
Vampirella - a vampire (or at least the alien equivalent), if you hadn't already guessed - is a heroic character who came to Earth when her own planet was dying (at least in her original origin story) and, upon her arrival, sought to protect it from the forces of evil. She first appeared on panel way back in 1969 in a self-titled comic strip in Warren Publishing’s black-and-white horror comics magazine and has gone on to appear in comics published by both Harris Publications and Dynamite Entertainment.

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Even Wolverine's lumberjack-meets-cowboy wardrobe has perfectly embodied the character's personality, and while his flannel and distinctive leather jackets might just look like clothes on anyone else, when the elements come together, they scream that this guy is the best there is at what he does. While the recent Days of Future Past film went mostly back to more of the same tactical leather, a deleted scene from last year's The Wolverine finally gave fans a glimpse of what Wolverine's classic duds might have looked like on film, even if, at this point, it amounts to little more than an easter egg.

But some female heroes haven’t been so lucky as to get more practical makeovers. Take for example Elizabeth Olsen's cleavage-baring Avengers: Infinity War look, which Olsen says isn't exactly her personal cup of tea for a character wading into battle with Mad Titans. Even she'll admit it's a step up from Wanda's comic book look, but in her words costumes like hers aren't "representing the average woman."

When he was originally working on Batman for National Comics, artist Bob Kane was thinking of the character as being a brighter hero, with a costume that would have bat-wings. Eventually, Kane brought in writer Bill Finger to work on the character idea and Finger explained to him that they should go the other direction. Finger was a big fan of the shadowy pulp fiction hero, the Shadow, and Finger felt that they should take the character into the shadows with a dark costume and a cape and a cowl to make him look more like a bat. Kane agreed and Batman was born.
Not only are they unnecessarily sexualised, they are also extremely impractical in most cases. For instance, why would a female character with no superhuman durability to speak of go into battle with heavily armoured and massively powered opponents wearing what is essentially a bikini? It shouldn't happen, but it does happen in comic books - and it happens a lot. Of course, there are characters whose durability is such that they don't necessarily need to wear full body armour in battle but, even so, revealing 90% of their body is still unnecessary.

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The former former fashion model and actress, Rebecca Alie Romijn, best known for her role as Mystique in the X-Men films, and for her recurring role as Alexis Meade on the television series Ugly Betty. In 2000’s X-Men Romijn had her first major movie role as Mystique; she returned to the role in 2003’s sequel X2: X-Men United, and again for X-Men: The Last Stand (2006). In these movies her costume consisted of blue wakeup and some strategically placed prosthetics on her otherwise nude body. In X2: X-Men United she shows up in a bar in one scene in her “normal” look, and also in X-Men: The Last Stand, she appears as a dark-haired “de-powered” Mystique.
If you talk to many comic book fans that entered puberty in the ‘90s, they might list Gambit as the cause of their sexual awakening. Maybe it was the Cajun accent? Or perhaps it’s the dark, red eyes? Either way, Gambit will go down as one of the all-time sexiest characters in the Marvel Universe. The character is one of the few on this list with a costume that covers almost his entire body, down to just leaving his face and hair exposed. This modesty doesn’t stop Gambit from being a character that’s known for his sex appeal.

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