The former former fashion model and actress, Rebecca Alie Romijn, best known for her role as Mystique in the X-Men films, and for her recurring role as Alexis Meade on the television series Ugly Betty. In 2000’s X-Men Romijn had her first major movie role as Mystique; she returned to the role in 2003’s sequel X2: X-Men United, and again for X-Men: The Last Stand (2006). In these movies her costume consisted of blue wakeup and some strategically placed prosthetics on her otherwise nude body. In X2: X-Men United she shows up in a bar in one scene in her “normal” look, and also in X-Men: The Last Stand, she appears as a dark-haired “de-powered” Mystique.

But some female heroes haven’t been so lucky as to get more practical makeovers. Take for example Elizabeth Olsen's cleavage-baring Avengers: Infinity War look, which Olsen says isn't exactly her personal cup of tea for a character wading into battle with Mad Titans. Even she'll admit it's a step up from Wanda's comic book look, but in her words costumes like hers aren't "representing the average woman."


If the threat of facing off against two of S.H.E.I.L.D.’s top heroes isn’t enough to stop a villain in his tracks, maybe the head-to-toe look of a detailed superhero costume will make the bad dudes think twice. We recommend having Captain America pairing up a big ol’ fist along with his Vibranium shield , and when Iron Man stands by his side, the high tech armament courtesy of Stark Industries is sure to give the most villainous threats a pause before they attempt to enact their diabolical plans. Pose your children side by side to achieve this shot, and even if their sights are solely set on filling up their trick-or-treat bags, they’ll be able to make the neighborhood rounds like true Avengers.

The 1960s Batman TV series helped to identify the fact that a black leather outfit was her best look, but that did not last too long in the comics themselves. Her most famous costume for years was a tight purple outfit designed by Jim Balent. The late, great Darwyn Cooke, however, came up with this brilliant mixture of a functional,black leather outfit that she wore on the Batman TV series and the film, Batman Returns. The use of the goggle mask was also a great touch. Jim Lee was wary of changing looks during his "Hush" series on Batman, but he adopted the Cooke Catwoman design entirely, that's how good it was.
And that's saying nothing of the show's villains. Even with Cesar Romero's ubiquitous mustache, you'd be harder pressed to find a more colorful cadre of costumed crooks that so gleefully and shamelessly embodied the campy, all-for-fun spirit of their medium. the 1966 Batman was, in many ways, like a comic ouroboros, with Batman's printed adventures and his television capers influencing each other in equal measure. All of this came full circle when DC Digital launched Batman '66, putting the show's highly stylized aesthetic under the pen of artists like Mike Allred and Ted Naifeh, and proving its enduring value in the process.
It’s a good thing Wonder Woman is here to watch the little ones, because we’re not sure The Riddler is going to best the best guardian over the young superheroes in training. Batman, Robin , and Catwoman can team up to hit the neighborhood in search of the best treats, but while The Riddler is busy trying to vex the neighbors with tricks and riddles, Wonder Woman can provide a watchful eye over her superheroes in training. When it comes to taking the yearly photo of the group, just let each member bust out their signature moves. Batman and Robin can look like stoic Gotham City residents, even while Catwoman throws her claws up in anticipation of a brand new heist. The Riddler is sure to be laughing, but as for Wonder Woman? Well, she’s the one that holds the group together. (Be it with her motherly instincts or just by keeping the Golden Lasso of Truth handy!)
Part of the appeal of the character was his awesome costume, which was designed by C.C. Beck. Fawcett's attempt to make Captain Marvel different from Superman was to try to work the magic angle more with their character, as Billy Batson says a magic word, "Shazam!" to transform into Captain Marvel, Earth's Mightiest Mortal. As a result, Beck went for a more ornate costume than Superman's, with a lot of flair thrown into the design. Elvis Presley would later mimic a lot of the elements of Captain Marvel's costume for his Las Vegas show outfits. If your superhero costume is cool enough that the King of Rock 'n' Roll works it into his stage outfits, then we think that merits a high spot on this countdown.

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Bomb Queen is actually a villain, but she has her own titular comic book series in Image Comics and, given her ridiculously revealing costume, it would be criminal not to include her. She first appeared as recently as 2006 and has eliminated and banned all superheroes from the fictional city she lives in - New Port City. She rules the city as its dictator and is a popular leader amongst the criminals who reside there.
Harley is one of the most entertaining villains Batman has to fight occasionally, second only to the Joker. She is the Joker's lover and partner in crime, although their relationship is weird on so many levels. Harley used to be a normal psychiatric intern in Arkham Asylum, where she met the Joker and then turned into the crazy person she is today.

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Oddly enough, this is the second entry on this countdown where a writer came up with a basic design and then John Romita turned it into a classic costume. When he was working on a new character to be a sort of villain (more like an anti-hero) in his run on Amazing Spider-Man, Gerry Conway came up with the design of the character having a skull on his chest. Marvel Art Director, John Romita, who had been working closely with Conway on Amazing Spider-Man, despite Romita no longer actively drawing the series anymore, took that idea and turned it into the famous Punisher skull costume. No matter what else you may think about the Punisher, that skull design is amazing.
Mystique is one of the most impressive characters in X-Men lore. Hardly is there any other character in DC or Marvel who can match up to her shape-shifting abilities. All mutants in the X-Men movies, cartoons, and publications are special, and although we have labeled Magneto's mutants as the villains, we can all accept that their actions are as a result of human hostility towards them.

Disappointed by Season 2, didn't grip me as much as Season 1, think it tried to do too much and should have focused on the bread and butter, with episode 9 finally getting to the kind of pace the entire series really lacked. The subplot was extremely uninteresting for me because it paled in comparison to what they could be focusing on. In some respects I felt it was an opportunity missed, was looking at my watch too much unfortunately through several episodes. Casting definitely a strong quality as well as the look of the drama, a lot of effort put in there.
Mike Zeck came up with the actual look and it is a stunning piece of design. All black except for the prominent white spider. Rick Leonardi also did some tweaks to the costume and it soon became the most controversial, yet surprisingly popular costume change in comic book history. Fans were aghast at first but then really started to enjoy the new look. Eventually, the design was adapted for the villain Venom, with Spider-Man returning to his classic look. It is popular enough, though, that it still makes occasional comebacks.

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