Originally what started as slightly extended cleavage somehow moved to the middle of Peej's chest, giving readers a view that honestly doesn't do her any favors while slugging it out with the likes of Despero. Her first "New 52" costume was the first time she was completely covered, but she soon reverted back to her more famous (and impractical) look.

When the Fantastic Four were introduced, Marvel was unsure if it was really prepared to transition from doing science fiction and horror comics to doing superhero comics, so the Fantastic Four originally wore just normal clothes. Even in their second issue, the team is decked out in normal outdoor wear. When the series received a tremendous response from the fans, though, Marvel knew that it had a superhero hit on their hands and so with the third issue, so creators and execs decided to give them costumes. However, they wanted to stick with the basic idea that these were not ordinary superheroes. These were sort of explorers more than traditional superheroes, and as a result, Jack Kirby came up with an awesome sort of utilitarian design for their jumpsuits. Famously, the costumes originally had masks but they decided to drop them.
In the mid 1950s, DC had a book called Showcase, which was designed to try out new characters. The first three issues had normal heroes like a fireman and a Navy "frogman." They sold terribly, so DC decided to mix things up and try to bring back superheroes. Artist Carmine Infantino was to design a new look for the Flash and he came up with an amazing look that likely made the book a sellout before people even cracked open the front cover! The sleek, lightning-themed red, yellow and white costume would become so popular that it remains one of the few superhero costumes to simply be brought over into television without massive overhauls to the design. It is just that good. There have been tweaks over the years, like altering the logo on the chest or adding lenses to the eyes in the mask, but generally, the costume remains the same today as it did back in 1956.

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We found out in a hurry after the hit films, Iron Man and Captain America: The First Avenger, that our brand new cinematic heroes were going to need a little help saving the world. That’s why fans were prepared when The Avengers took the world by storm! With a bevy of films under the Marvel Cinematic Universe, this group has become a fan favorite for those watching and wanting to pay homage to them by going in costume. When you can find a friend to go in a Hulk costume or Thor costume we think you’re going to find that your group has the chops to get the job done. And if you have a femme fatale to be the Black Widow? Well, then you’re going to be downright unstoppable in your Marvel costumes!

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Similarly, Gil Kane going for a sleek sort of flight suit look for the Green Lantern Corps costume was a brilliant decision in the late 1950s. Kane's simple but striking design has been so good that it continues to be used by Green Lanterns over five decades later and no one seems prepared to go to a different design any time soon, at least as the base look (many lanterns diversify and personalize their looks now). Scientists and test pilots might not be treated like the heroes they were in the 1950s, but this costume remains timeless.
As noted earlier, patriotic-themed heroes were hot in the early 1940s. America was going through a strange period of both isolationism and nationalism at the same time. Americans were really proud of their country, but also didn't want to get involved in the war in Europe. Patriotic-themed heroes captured that feel, by having noble American heroes defeat villains who dared to come over here to mess with us. Things got bolder, though, when Timely Comics introduced Captain America, who broke out of the isolationist viewpoints by having the lead character punch out Adolf Hitler on the cover of the first issue, a full year before the United States actually went to war with Nazi Germany!

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Once Superman became a massive success, other comic book companies were quickly trying to do their own versions of the Man of Steel. National Comics (now DC Comics) was quick to litigate, though, when execs felt their character was being infringed on. One knockoff character, Wonder Man, was quickly dropped after National sued. Captain Marvel, however, fared better. While clearly created as an attempt to do its own version of Superman, Fawcett's superhero grew so popular that by 1944, he was outselling Superman even!
By the end of the 1940s, superheroes had lost a lot of their appeal to the public. National Comics (now DC Comics) went from having dozens of superhero titles to only having a handful. Most of the members of the Justice Society of America fell out of sight in the world of National. Flash and Green Lantern went from appearing in multiple titles to not appearing in any books at all!

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