Artist Dave Cockrum had already famously re-designed most of the members of the Legion of Super-Heroes, giving them modern revamps to their rather staid older costumes. His Lightning Lad re-design was particularly good, as while many of the character got later revamps over the years, Cockrum's Lightning Lad look became a standard one for the character for decades. Essentially, Cockrum was so far ahead of the game that when the team was revamped in the 1990s, his early 1970s design fit right in. While working on the Legion, Cockrum designed a new team of heroes called the Outsiders who were set to team up with the Legion. DC passed on the concept. 

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Mike Zeck came up with the actual look and it is a stunning piece of design. All black except for the prominent white spider. Rick Leonardi also did some tweaks to the costume and it soon became the most controversial, yet surprisingly popular costume change in comic book history. Fans were aghast at first but then really started to enjoy the new look. Eventually, the design was adapted for the villain Venom, with Spider-Man returning to his classic look. It is popular enough, though, that it still makes occasional comebacks.
Arguably, Iron Man has the coolest costume out of all the comic universes, because it's both beautiful and functional. It's not just the little kids who want to grow up to be Iron Man, even grown men would love to fly around and shoot at stuff. If the Iron Man suit was real, people would sell anything they could to purchase it, because it turns an ordinary guy into a powerful superhero with the strength and firepower to defeat a whole army of superhumans.
This is a tricky one, since Iron Man has technically gone through a number of different designs over the years, as the outfit is always evolving. It is difficult to pinpoint precisely which armor is the best, so we have decided to pull back a bit and note that the more general "yellow and gold" design is what we're going to celebrate here. You see, when Iron Man first debuted, he wore what looked to just be a suit of big, bulky, gray iron. When he became a regular superhero, Marvel tried to fix that design flaw by literally just spray-painting the armor gold. "Oh no, he's hideous!" "Oh, never mind. He's spray-painted gold. It looks great now!" Then Steve Ditko designed a new armor that worked red into the design and it really clicked.

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Hot and gorgeous Anne Hathaway played cat-woman in ‘The Dark Knight Rises’- the last installment of the Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight Trilogy. For this challenging role, she went through a lot of physical fitness and martial arts sessions as needed to look perfect, which she did. Though, she didn’t have a major role in the movie but managed to steal many hearts with her performance and sexy kitty looks.
Soon, other artists streamlined Shuster's original design and made it look more like spandex. Thus, the classic Superman look was born. This was not just the ideal Superman look, but it became the ideal look for superhero costumes period. The success of this design informed essentially every superhero costume ever to follow after it. For a character as popular as Superman, who has been adapted into so many different forms of media, it is an amazing testament to how good his first costume was that when Action Comics hit #1000, Superman was wearing essentially the same costume that he wore 999 issues earlier. 

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It didn't innovate, and it didn't try to, but the original film's Superman costume faithfully and lovingly recreated the colorful, larger than life look that every kid - and most adults - love about Superman, from his shameless trunks, to his flowing, flying red cape, to his perfect spit curl, this was Superman given life, and it paved the way for every superhero film since. Recently, Man of Steel saw a much more stylized take on DC's Krytptonian hero, and while that look had its merits, Reeve's original look is still the definitive take on Superman on film.


Superheroes in comic books all have unique personality traits, skills, abilities and power-sets, but the one thing about them all that is truly memorable is their costumes. Sometimes, the costumes or the symbols on the costumes become as iconic as the heroes themselves. From bright, bold colours to stealthy dark outfits and from lycra to armour, if you see a superhero's outfit sans the hero himself you will immediately know who it belongs to. The nature of superhero costumes has evolved over the years. Back in the early days of comics, it was pretty much all about capes and tight-fitting bodysuits - but there is a huge variation in the styles donned by our favourite characters in the modern day, Of course, it's not just about how recognisable a superhero's outfit is - in this article, we'll be looking at the very coolest costumes, regardless of how iconic and recognisable they are and regardless of how popular the heroes who wear them are. Of course, this topic is entirely subjective and we get that, so we're really looking for you guys to give us your own personal opinions about it in the comments area below the article. Here are the twenty coolest male superhero costumes in comics...
This is a tricky one, since Iron Man has technically gone through a number of different designs over the years, as the outfit is always evolving. It is difficult to pinpoint precisely which armor is the best, so we have decided to pull back a bit and note that the more general "yellow and gold" design is what we're going to celebrate here. You see, when Iron Man first debuted, he wore what looked to just be a suit of big, bulky, gray iron. When he became a regular superhero, Marvel tried to fix that design flaw by literally just spray-painting the armor gold. "Oh no, he's hideous!" "Oh, never mind. He's spray-painted gold. It looks great now!" Then Steve Ditko designed a new armor that worked red into the design and it really clicked.

Characters like Tony Stark and Diana Prince are more than just good looks, however. When you read the adventures of Captain America, you don’t think about how sexy Steve Rogers is. Well, maybe you do, but that’s not all you care about. Unfortunately, for some characters, their appearance trumps most everything else about them. Let’s take a look at eight male and eight female characters in comics who are viewed as being more “hot” than “hero.”

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As noted earlier, patriotic-themed heroes were hot in the early 1940s. America was going through a strange period of both isolationism and nationalism at the same time. Americans were really proud of their country, but also didn't want to get involved in the war in Europe. Patriotic-themed heroes captured that feel, by having noble American heroes defeat villains who dared to come over here to mess with us. Things got bolder, though, when Timely Comics introduced Captain America, who broke out of the isolationist viewpoints by having the lead character punch out Adolf Hitler on the cover of the first issue, a full year before the United States actually went to war with Nazi Germany!

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After Todd was killed off, DC decided to do a revamp for the Robin costume for its third attempt at a sidekick for Batman, Tim Drake. The company turned to famed artist, Neal Adams, who cleverly made sure to work out a larger payment in case the costume he came up with was also going to be used in the Batman films that were coming out at the time. The new design kept a lot of the original elements of the first Robin costume, but did one of the best modernization jobs on a costume ever, adding pants and a black-tinge to Robin's normally bright yellow cape.
The hero doing the punching was courtesy of a clever design by Joe Simon, who took the concept of the red, white and blue split of the American flag and worked all three colors into the design of Captain America, giving him chain mail in the process to give him a bit of a classic knight design. Few superhero costumes have remained quite as unchanged as Captain America has for nearly eight decades now, with the only changes mostly been adding things like military belts and the like.
Not only are they unnecessarily sexualised, they are also extremely impractical in most cases. For instance, why would a female character with no superhuman durability to speak of go into battle with heavily armoured and massively powered opponents wearing what is essentially a bikini? It shouldn't happen, but it does happen in comic books - and it happens a lot. Of course, there are characters whose durability is such that they don't necessarily need to wear full body armour in battle but, even so, revealing 90% of their body is still unnecessary.

Mike Zeck came up with the actual look and it is a stunning piece of design. All black except for the prominent white spider. Rick Leonardi also did some tweaks to the costume and it soon became the most controversial, yet surprisingly popular costume change in comic book history. Fans were aghast at first but then really started to enjoy the new look. Eventually, the design was adapted for the villain Venom, with Spider-Man returning to his classic look. It is popular enough, though, that it still makes occasional comebacks.


After Todd was killed off, DC decided to do a revamp for the Robin costume for its third attempt at a sidekick for Batman, Tim Drake. The company turned to famed artist, Neal Adams, who cleverly made sure to work out a larger payment in case the costume he came up with was also going to be used in the Batman films that were coming out at the time. The new design kept a lot of the original elements of the first Robin costume, but did one of the best modernization jobs on a costume ever, adding pants and a black-tinge to Robin's normally bright yellow cape.


Mike Zeck came up with the actual look and it is a stunning piece of design. All black except for the prominent white spider. Rick Leonardi also did some tweaks to the costume and it soon became the most controversial, yet surprisingly popular costume change in comic book history. Fans were aghast at first but then really started to enjoy the new look. Eventually, the design was adapted for the villain Venom, with Spider-Man returning to his classic look. It is popular enough, though, that it still makes occasional comebacks.
Witchblade first appeared in Top Cow Comics – an imprint of Image Comics – in 1995. Witchblade isn't actually a character in itself, so to speak - it's actually a sentient supernatural artifact, in the form of a gauntlet, which bonds to its (strictly) female host (the most well-known being NYPD homicide detective Sara Pezzini), providing said host with a variety of powers and a very skimpy costume (in essence, they become the Witchblade as a result).

You won't find a more perfectly adapted, visually definitive adaptation of a superhero on film than with Marvel's Iron Man. While Robert Downey, Jr.'s snarky, nuanced Tony Stark practically rewrote the character's entire comic persona, his armor was equally influential on its source material, proving that fans were willing to accept and embrace a hot-rod inspired, nuts'n'bolts'n'circuitboards take on the iron Avenger.
By the end of the 1940s, superheroes had lost a lot of their appeal to the public. National Comics (now DC Comics) went from having dozens of superhero titles to only having a handful. Most of the members of the Justice Society of America fell out of sight in the world of National. Flash and Green Lantern went from appearing in multiple titles to not appearing in any books at all!

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