Also, Loki. What else needs to be said? At this point, many would consider Tom Hiddelston's brash, playful take on the God of mischief as essential to the Avengers' onscreen presence as his counterpart Chris Hemsworth's muscles or RDJ's snark, and the character was perfectly embodied by regal looking Asgardian robes and even smart, keenly designed suits as called for by the scene. Not only that, but it's hard to argue with the absolute best take on the Hulk in film yet, or the perfection of Samuel L. Jackson's embodiment of the Ultimate Nick Fury, who actually borrowed Jackson's countenance years before the character even appeared on film.
When the Silver Age began, there were two particular types of characters who were seen as really cool that no longer get treated the same way in popular fiction -- scientists and test pilots. Scientists were the heroes of every other science fiction comic book from DC and Marvel in the 1950s and 1960s. Reed Richards being a cool scientist was a totally normal thing at the time. Similarly, test pilot Chuck Yeager was one of the most admired heroes in the United States in the 1950s due to his skills as a test pilot. You need to keep those things in mind when you realize how modeling Hal Jordan after guys like Yeager defined the character so much in the late 1950s.
Her abilities basically equate to being a peak human athlete, with survival skills and great combat abilities (think Tarzan, but female). She has encountered a number of well-known characters, such as Wolverine, Daredevil, Spider-Man and Black Widow. As for her costume, it's basically a ragged bikini made up of materials you'd expect to find in the jungle.
It has been proven in the short-lived “Witchblade” TV series and more recent comics that the character of Sara Pezzini can wield the Witchblade without losing her clothes. Unfortunately, most of the comic book version of the character has never really had this as an option. Eventually, without fail, Sara finds herself in a state of undress. When your main character is almost nude throughout the series, it’s not surprising that readers would associate her with her looks instead of her actions.

Okay, let's be real, Daredevil's original costume was kind of garish. But really, Bill Everett's first pass for Daredevil's look really did have some good parts to it. For instance, the idea of the horns on the head so that he literally looks like a devil was a good idea. The part that did not work was to mix yellow and reddish-brown for the color scheme of the outfit. Also, it was odd that he went with just a single D on his chest at first.


In 1974, Marvel Editor-in-Chief Roy Thomas decided that there should be a Canadian superhero, so he asked Incredible Hulk writer Len Wein to come up with one and either call him the Badger or Wolverine. Wein read up about wolverines and decided to use that name. When the character concept was developed by Wein, Marvel's Art Director, John Romita, was brought in to then give the character a look. Romita essentially designed a costume that made the character look like an animal. That was fine for his first appearance.
There are so many Captain America costumes to choose from, but we say go with the latest and greatest from Avengers: Infinity War. This muscle-chested costume comes with a belt, cool mask, and even 3D boot-tops! You can buy the shield separately, but you know you won't want to lug that around while hitting Halloween parties (unless you're hosting and it doubles as a serving tray). 
Could you imagine anyone other than Chris Hemsworth playing Thor in the Marvel Cinematic Universe? Probably not. It’s not because his acting is Oscar-worthy, either. It’s because of that scene in the first “Thor” movie where he walks around without a shirt, right? Don’t say no, you know we’re right. No other hero in modern superhero movies is viewed as more eye-candy than hero than Chris Hemsworth’s Thor.
Even Wolverine's lumberjack-meets-cowboy wardrobe has perfectly embodied the character's personality, and while his flannel and distinctive leather jackets might just look like clothes on anyone else, when the elements come together, they scream that this guy is the best there is at what he does. While the recent Days of Future Past film went mostly back to more of the same tactical leather, a deleted scene from last year's The Wolverine finally gave fans a glimpse of what Wolverine's classic duds might have looked like on film, even if, at this point, it amounts to little more than an easter egg.

Mike Zeck came up with the actual look and it is a stunning piece of design. All black except for the prominent white spider. Rick Leonardi also did some tweaks to the costume and it soon became the most controversial, yet surprisingly popular costume change in comic book history. Fans were aghast at first but then really started to enjoy the new look. Eventually, the design was adapted for the villain Venom, with Spider-Man returning to his classic look. It is popular enough, though, that it still makes occasional comebacks.

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