Witchblade first appeared in Top Cow Comics – an imprint of Image Comics – in 1995. Witchblade isn't actually a character in itself, so to speak - it's actually a sentient supernatural artifact, in the form of a gauntlet, which bonds to its (strictly) female host (the most well-known being NYPD homicide detective Sara Pezzini), providing said host with a variety of powers and a very skimpy costume (in essence, they become the Witchblade as a result).
It didn't innovate, and it didn't try to, but the original film's Superman costume faithfully and lovingly recreated the colorful, larger than life look that every kid - and most adults - love about Superman, from his shameless trunks, to his flowing, flying red cape, to his perfect spit curl, this was Superman given life, and it paved the way for every superhero film since. Recently, Man of Steel saw a much more stylized take on DC's Krytptonian hero, and while that look had its merits, Reeve's original look is still the definitive take on Superman on film.
When Frank Quitely redesigned the character for “New X-Men,” her costume consisted of an impossibly constructed top that had a huge “X” cut out in the front. The exact physics of the costume were never explained, but it’s clear that the artist was trying to emphasize her sexuality. The costume has since been updated, thankfully, but her sex appeal is still front and center, even today. Just searching “Emma Frost” in Google Images shows you exactly how she’s viewed. There aren’t any panels from her appearances in years of comics. Instead, it’s all sexually suggestive pictures.
Soon, other artists streamlined Shuster's original design and made it look more like spandex. Thus, the classic Superman look was born. This was not just the ideal Superman look, but it became the ideal look for superhero costumes period. The success of this design informed essentially every superhero costume ever to follow after it. For a character as popular as Superman, who has been adapted into so many different forms of media, it is an amazing testament to how good his first costume was that when Action Comics hit #1000, Superman was wearing essentially the same costume that he wore 999 issues earlier.

Batman stands tall above Gotham City, and often times he has the weight of the entire world on his shoulders. Does he have what it takes to defeat The Joker ? Bane? Doomsday? When your little one takes the mantle of The Dark Knight, there will be no need to fret over which villain is threatening the neighborhood, because we’re sure he’ll be able to just focus on his Halloween party and all of the trick-or-treating fun. But when it’s time to strike a pose and show the world that he’s The Bat, you’re going to want to get the picture just right. A little breeze will make his cape look epic, and when he has his fists on his hips, the molded effect of this premier costume really stands out. A stern face will project his newfound power, but if he happens to crack a smile, that photo will look just as epic.
Arguably, Iron Man has the coolest costume out of all the comic universes, because it's both beautiful and functional. It's not just the little kids who want to grow up to be Iron Man, even grown men would love to fly around and shoot at stuff. If the Iron Man suit was real, people would sell anything they could to purchase it, because it turns an ordinary guy into a powerful superhero with the strength and firepower to defeat a whole army of superhumans.
As noted earlier, patriotic-themed heroes were hot in the early 1940s. America was going through a strange period of both isolationism and nationalism at the same time. Americans were really proud of their country, but also didn't want to get involved in the war in Europe. Patriotic-themed heroes captured that feel, by having noble American heroes defeat villains who dared to come over here to mess with us. Things got bolder, though, when Timely Comics introduced Captain America, who broke out of the isolationist viewpoints by having the lead character punch out Adolf Hitler on the cover of the first issue, a full year before the United States actually went to war with Nazi Germany!

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