Star Sapphire is the name of several characters in DC Comics - most notably Carol Ferris - who often cross the line between being both superheroines and villains. They wear violet-coloured rings that are essentially the same as the green ones worn by Green Lanterns, which provide wielders with powers like flight, energy blasts, the ability to augment their physical statistics and the ability to create powerful constructs of anything they can think of.
The character of Dawn, as drawn by Joseph Michael Linsner, oozes sex appeal. She’s the goddess of birth and rebirth as seen in various comics since the late ‘80s, but many comic book readers probably recognize her by her sexy clothing and red hair. Almost every cover featuring the character depicts her in assorted lingerie with an emphasis placed on her breasts. Similar to Lady Death, Dawn is probably more recognized from ads in Wizard Magazine than in her actual comic series.

For a character who has been such a major part of Batman's comic book history, Catwoman has had a surprisingly unimpressive list of comic book costumes over the years. When she debuted, she was simply dressed in normal clothes, as the name "The Cat" was more general for a thief than anything, and not something that was actually a costume motif. When she then started to reappear as a villain, she went through a few different uninspiring outfits. Then, due to the Comics Code, she stopped appearing in Batman comics period for over a decade.
In the 1950s, Joe Simon and Jack Kirby, the same guys who brought Timely Captain America, had worked on some comic book ideas in the 1950s and one of them ended up becoming the Fly for Archie Comics. When Stan Lee asked Kirby to come up with a new spider-themed hero, The King of Comics adapted some of the design ideas that he had for the earlier spider hero and used them for Spider-Man, including a gun that shot webs. Lee was not a fan of the look and asked Steve Ditko to try to do a take on Spider-Man. Ditko dropped pretty much every element of Kirby's design, including turning the web gun into webshooters that Spider-Man had on his wrists.

Here, we will take a look at the very best of the best when it comes to superhero design. Do note that we are working with at least one major caveat, that the superheroes in question have iconic costumes. It does not do you much good to have a really cool costume if no one knows who you are. As a result, we are heavily weighing in the cultural impact of the costume design when we rank them. Where does a costume stand, historically, within the medium itself? That is one of the most important questions that we address when we start our ranking of the best superhero costumes of all-time.
Being a kid can be tough. After all, our little ones know they have to wait a few years before they can fulfill their superhero potential. But there is one holiday that lets them get their inner superhero out. Of course, Halloween is the day that lets any boy or girl join up with the Avengers, Justice League, or the X-Men to live out their superhero dreams. So when groups of tiny heroes descend on local neighborhoods in search of Halloween treats, we’re sure they’re going to want to feel like real authentic heroes. Our deluxe kids’ superhero costumes fulfill that wish, and with a few extra touches you’ll be able to help them seal the deal as bonafide, authentic superheroes. Striking just the right pose or completing the ensemble with the perfect superhero accessories could be just the addition that take your little one’s experience from ordinary to extraordinary, so peruse these Love Your Look ideas for the tricks of the trade that we use to set the superhero scene just right!

Emma Frost is a mutant in Marvel comic books who first appeared on panel in 1980. Originally presented as a villain, she has evolved into a superheroine over the years. Her powers include telepathy and the ability to turn her body into a diamond form, which obviously makes her incredibly durable and also grants her superhuman strength (though she can't use her telepathy whilst in that form).


By the end of the 1940s, superheroes had lost a lot of their appeal to the public. National Comics (now DC Comics) went from having dozens of superhero titles to only having a handful. Most of the members of the Justice Society of America fell out of sight in the world of National. Flash and Green Lantern went from appearing in multiple titles to not appearing in any books at all!

superhero costumes for women

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