Bald-headed Moondragon AKA Heather Douglas - who first appeared in 1973 - is a Marvel character with a complex backstory that involves Thanos, Drax the Destroyer, Mentor and the monks of Shao-Lom. She is an incredibly powerful telepath, a telekinetic, a superb martial artist and is highly skilled in genetics and engineering. She doesn't possess any superhuman durability, however, and often goes up against some of the most powerful beings in Marvel's cosmic hierarchy - and yet she barely wears any clothes.
Bald-headed Moondragon AKA Heather Douglas - who first appeared in 1973 - is a Marvel character with a complex backstory that involves Thanos, Drax the Destroyer, Mentor and the monks of Shao-Lom. She is an incredibly powerful telepath, a telekinetic, a superb martial artist and is highly skilled in genetics and engineering. She doesn't possess any superhuman durability, however, and often goes up against some of the most powerful beings in Marvel's cosmic hierarchy - and yet she barely wears any clothes.
Jessica Alba is a damn hot and sexy actress from Hollywood, who has played a Marvel comic superhero character in a two movies series of Fantastic Four as Sue Storm-an Invisible Woman. The female superhero character Sue Storm-an Invisible Woman was a part of a team of four superheroes with amazing abilities, known as Fantastic Four. In these movies, her costume was a hot skin-tight blue dress which made her look even sexier and hotter than ever!
As noted earlier, patriotic-themed heroes were hot in the early 1940s. America was going through a strange period of both isolationism and nationalism at the same time. Americans were really proud of their country, but also didn't want to get involved in the war in Europe. Patriotic-themed heroes captured that feel, by having noble American heroes defeat villains who dared to come over here to mess with us. Things got bolder, though, when Timely Comics introduced Captain America, who broke out of the isolationist viewpoints by having the lead character punch out Adolf Hitler on the cover of the first issue, a full year before the United States actually went to war with Nazi Germany!

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Beyoncé is one of those people who God blessed with everything; a great body, amazing acting skills, she can dance, and she has an outstanding singing voice. Unlike most other celebrity musicians we have today, Beyoncé would win every singing competition out there, even among people who have no clue who she is (although it would be hard to find such people).
Vartox belongs on this list, not because of his sexy nature, but because of how he was created to be sexy and ultimately failed. Unfortunately, over the years, the sexy nature of his design was lost, and the ridiculous costume and silly look defined the character. His look is also lampooned a bit in his appearance in “Power Girl.” There, he tries to woo Power Girl into helping him repopulate his home world. He dons a black leather speedo and see-thru robe, trying to show how sexy he is. Unlike others on this list who are actual sex symbols, Vartox is here because he was created to be a sex symbol, but fans never really bought into it.
She has continued to give people a reason to make her the subject of discussions everywhere, from trying to break the Internet with nude photos, performing every cosmetic procedure out there, and even marrying Kanye West. However, despite having haters everywhere, we can all confess that those cosmetic procedures have definitely paid off and she looks amazing.
Starfire might have become the most sexualized character in superhero comics, and that’s saying something. Debuting back in 1980, in “DC Comics Presents” #26, Starfire was always drawn scantily clad. Her orange skin and red hair were the center of attention, with just a few purple strips of fabric covering her body. It’s hard to justify her outfit and sexualization when some of her most famous scenes in comics revolve around her lack of clothing.
Sure, critics might say that her barely-there costume was a product of the time. In the ‘80s and ‘90s, comic book fans responded to female characters that were dressed in next to nothing. However, when DC began the “New 52” relaunch, they came under fire from readers with their new version of Starfire. Her already skimpy costume was reduced even more to being almost non-existent. She appeared in a bikini and nude in scenes, and it was almost as if readers were transported back to the mid-‘90s “Marvel Swimsuit Special.” It wasn’t until recently that the character has received a much more appropriate costume.
As noted earlier, patriotic-themed heroes were hot in the early 1940s. America was going through a strange period of both isolationism and nationalism at the same time. Americans were really proud of their country, but also didn't want to get involved in the war in Europe. Patriotic-themed heroes captured that feel, by having noble American heroes defeat villains who dared to come over here to mess with us. Things got bolder, though, when Timely Comics introduced Captain America, who broke out of the isolationist viewpoints by having the lead character punch out Adolf Hitler on the cover of the first issue, a full year before the United States actually went to war with Nazi Germany!

superhero costume with tutu


Harry George Peter was already 61 years old when he came up with the design for the new female superhero that William Marston was planning for All-American Comics, then called Suprema. This was 1941, when patriotic characters were a big hit in comics, so Wonder Woman definitely had a strong Star Spangled Banner take on her design. In the early 1980s, DC Comics helped create a short-lived Wonder Woman charity, the logo of which was the double W's, which led to Wonder Woman adapting the "WW" on her chest emblem. Other than the emblem, the only thing different from her classic look than in Peter's original design is that he had Wonder Woman wearing a skirt instead of short pants.
Bomb Queen is actually a villain, but she has her own titular comic book series in Image Comics and, given her ridiculously revealing costume, it would be criminal not to include her. She first appeared as recently as 2006 and has eliminated and banned all superheroes from the fictional city she lives in - New Port City. She rules the city as its dictator and is a popular leader amongst the criminals who reside there.

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By the end of the 1940s, superheroes had lost a lot of their appeal to the public. National Comics (now DC Comics) went from having dozens of superhero titles to only having a handful. Most of the members of the Justice Society of America fell out of sight in the world of National. Flash and Green Lantern went from appearing in multiple titles to not appearing in any books at all!
Once Superman became a massive success, other comic book companies were quickly trying to do their own versions of the Man of Steel. National Comics (now DC Comics) was quick to litigate, though, when execs felt their character was being infringed on. One knockoff character, Wonder Man, was quickly dropped after National sued. Captain Marvel, however, fared better. While clearly created as an attempt to do its own version of Superman, Fawcett's superhero grew so popular that by 1944, he was outselling Superman even!
Let’s put the massive nature of his sex appeal in perspective. Gambit is not a great hero. In fact, he is responsible for the massacre of the Morlocks by the Marauders. He led the killers to the Morlock tunnels, and then went on to hide this from his fellow X-Men. Even with doing something so despicable, fans still pine over the Cajun hero. In fact, if you ask readers to name one defining characteristic of Gambit, they’d probably mention his love affair with fellow X-person, Rogue, and forget the horrible atrocity that he allowed to happen. There’s no denying that Gambit is much more of a sex symbol than a hero.
Bomb Queen is actually a villain, but she has her own titular comic book series in Image Comics and, given her ridiculously revealing costume, it would be criminal not to include her. She first appeared as recently as 2006 and has eliminated and banned all superheroes from the fictional city she lives in - New Port City. She rules the city as its dictator and is a popular leader amongst the criminals who reside there.
Here, we will take a look at the very best of the best when it comes to superhero design. Do note that we are working with at least one major caveat, that the superheroes in question have iconic costumes. It does not do you much good to have a really cool costume if no one knows who you are. As a result, we are heavily weighing in the cultural impact of the costume design when we rank them. Where does a costume stand, historically, within the medium itself? That is one of the most important questions that we address when we start our ranking of the best superhero costumes of all-time.

Okay, let's be real, Daredevil's original costume was kind of garish. But really, Bill Everett's first pass for Daredevil's look really did have some good parts to it. For instance, the idea of the horns on the head so that he literally looks like a devil was a good idea. The part that did not work was to mix yellow and reddish-brown for the color scheme of the outfit. Also, it was odd that he went with just a single D on his chest at first.
With our wide selection of styles, you are sure to find the perfect sexy superhero or villain costume for any themed Cosplay party or event. And don't forget about the accessories. When the costume comes off at the end of the night, you will want to maintain your identity with nothing but your cape or boots. When the party is over, you can rescue your lover over and over with after hours super action.

Soon, other artists streamlined Shuster's original design and made it look more like spandex. Thus, the classic Superman look was born. This was not just the ideal Superman look, but it became the ideal look for superhero costumes period. The success of this design informed essentially every superhero costume ever to follow after it. For a character as popular as Superman, who has been adapted into so many different forms of media, it is an amazing testament to how good his first costume was that when Action Comics hit #1000, Superman was wearing essentially the same costume that he wore 999 issues earlier.

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