Debuting in “Cry for Dawn” #1 way back in 1989, the character has only show up sporadically throughout the decades. However, when people think of the hottest female characters in comics, she’ll always rank highly. She is so defined by her looks that Dragon Con held a Dawn look-a-like contest from 1998 to 2010, even when the character wasn’t seen in any recent comic books. Now, don’t think that we are somehow saying that the character isn’t a great character because her looks are so important, but rather that the iconic design by Linsner has allowed the character to live on through the years based on looks alone.

What's really interesting, then, in retrospect, is how the first attempt to make a Punisher motion picture, starring Dolphn Lundgren as the Punisher, decided to drop the skull motif from the character's chest. Without the awesome costume, the Punisher sure does seem like every other gunslinging hero out for revenge in the world of popular fiction, of which there have been many examples over the years. Few characters have relied on a cool costume quite as much as the Punisher.


Vartox belongs on this list, not because of his sexy nature, but because of how he was created to be sexy and ultimately failed. Unfortunately, over the years, the sexy nature of his design was lost, and the ridiculous costume and silly look defined the character. His look is also lampooned a bit in his appearance in “Power Girl.” There, he tries to woo Power Girl into helping him repopulate his home world. He dons a black leather speedo and see-thru robe, trying to show how sexy he is. Unlike others on this list who are actual sex symbols, Vartox is here because he was created to be a sex symbol, but fans never really bought into it.

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Years later, John Byrne revamped the costumes slightly to invert the colors a bit, so that the collars were now white and the blue was tinged with black. It is basically the Kirby design, just with a slight edge to it, so it is our pick for the best Fantastic Four outfits, since the bright blue outfits could sometimes seem to be a bit too bold, color-wise.
Wonder Woman has finally made her debut on the silver screen, and for us, we’re just glad to have her around! There’s no saying what threats could be facing the world, so having the Amazing Amazonian around for backup seems like a good idea. If you’d like to make sure you have an Amazing Amazon of your own to help save the day, we’re sure your girl will be up for playing the part. Just accessorize her signature movie look with the included armbands, gauntlets, and headpiece, and she’ll have the style look that made Princess Diana of Themyscira famous. Let her pose with and give a stunning and stoic look towards the camera. The bad guys won’t stand a chance when your girl is on the DC Comics team!
Sometimes mutant powers are really just the thing to bring a group together, and if your gang is ready to put their super human abilities to work, then there’s only one team for you: The X-Men! Storm can command the team while Cyclops keeps opponents at bay with his concussive optic blast. If you have a quick-witted member of your group, a Deadpool Halloween costume is sure to turn them into the crass and sharp-tongued Wade Wilson. Up the ante by getting a friend to go in a Wolverine costume, and you’ll have one mutant posse that no villain is going to want to tangle with. We heard Wolvie’s usually hungry though, so you’re going to want to bring plenty of snacks. “Hey. Pass the chip dip, bub!”
There were some slight changes from Ditko's armor to the one featured here, mostly with the face mask, but since those changes were made, that basic design has been fairly consistent. Now, Iron Man's armor has obviously been altered in other ways as technology has changed, but the basic yellow and gold design has been used almost exclusively since then. No matter how fancy the armor gets otherwise, the yellow and gold set-up is a catchy design.

Witchblade first appeared in Top Cow Comics – an imprint of Image Comics – in 1995. Witchblade isn't actually a character in itself, so to speak - it's actually a sentient supernatural artifact, in the form of a gauntlet, which bonds to its (strictly) female host (the most well-known being NYPD homicide detective Sara Pezzini), providing said host with a variety of powers and a very skimpy costume (in essence, they become the Witchblade as a result).


Thor, Captain America, and even Hulk and Iron Man all got new looks for Marvel's groundbreaking blockbuster, and while the characters all looked great in their own films, they never looked better than when they finally came together under and unified aesthetic. From Cap's streamlined look, to Hawkeye's subtly comic-influenced S.H.I.E.L.D. garb, the Avengers were most visually powerful as a unit, where their comic book essence was captured nearly flawlessly by pitch-perfect visual cues.
Emma Frost is a mutant in Marvel comic books who first appeared on panel in 1980. Originally presented as a villain, she has evolved into a superheroine over the years. Her powers include telepathy and the ability to turn her body into a diamond form, which obviously makes her incredibly durable and also grants her superhuman strength (though she can't use her telepathy whilst in that form).
Even Wolverine's lumberjack-meets-cowboy wardrobe has perfectly embodied the character's personality, and while his flannel and distinctive leather jackets might just look like clothes on anyone else, when the elements come together, they scream that this guy is the best there is at what he does. While the recent Days of Future Past film went mostly back to more of the same tactical leather, a deleted scene from last year's The Wolverine finally gave fans a glimpse of what Wolverine's classic duds might have looked like on film, even if, at this point, it amounts to little more than an easter egg.
When he was originally working on Batman for National Comics, artist Bob Kane was thinking of the character as being a brighter hero, with a costume that would have bat-wings. Eventually, Kane brought in writer Bill Finger to work on the character idea and Finger explained to him that they should go the other direction. Finger was a big fan of the shadowy pulp fiction hero, the Shadow, and Finger felt that they should take the character into the shadows with a dark costume and a cape and a cowl to make him look more like a bat. Kane agreed and Batman was born.
Also, Loki. What else needs to be said? At this point, many would consider Tom Hiddelston's brash, playful take on the God of mischief as essential to the Avengers' onscreen presence as his counterpart Chris Hemsworth's muscles or RDJ's snark, and the character was perfectly embodied by regal looking Asgardian robes and even smart, keenly designed suits as called for by the scene. Not only that, but it's hard to argue with the absolute best take on the Hulk in film yet, or the perfection of Samuel L. Jackson's embodiment of the Ultimate Nick Fury, who actually borrowed Jackson's countenance years before the character even appeared on film.
Starfox is probably the only hero in the Marvel Universe actually defined by his sexuality, not just to outside readers, but also to the characters in the universe. Describing Starfox as an actual hero is a bit of stretch. It’s more fitting to call him a cosmic womanizer that goes around the Marvel Universe attempting to seduce female characters. He is most definitely more hot than hero.
It didn't innovate, and it didn't try to, but the original film's Superman costume faithfully and lovingly recreated the colorful, larger than life look that every kid - and most adults - love about Superman, from his shameless trunks, to his flowing, flying red cape, to his perfect spit curl, this was Superman given life, and it paved the way for every superhero film since. Recently, Man of Steel saw a much more stylized take on DC's Krytptonian hero, and while that look had its merits, Reeve's original look is still the definitive take on Superman on film.
The former former fashion model and actress, Rebecca Alie Romijn, best known for her role as Mystique in the X-Men films, and for her recurring role as Alexis Meade on the television series Ugly Betty. In 2000’s X-Men Romijn had her first major movie role as Mystique; she returned to the role in 2003’s sequel X2: X-Men United, and again for X-Men: The Last Stand (2006). In these movies her costume consisted of blue wakeup and some strategically placed prosthetics on her otherwise nude body. In X2: X-Men United she shows up in a bar in one scene in her “normal” look, and also in X-Men: The Last Stand, she appears as a dark-haired “de-powered” Mystique.
Catwoman has no shame about her preferred choice of action, stealing and being a top notch catburglar are at the top of her list. But when the times call for a hero, she has no problem standing side-by-side with Batman to team up and defeat the baddies. When she’s on the prowl for precious jewels, though, is sure to be the most opportune time for a quick picture. Once she takes out the vital controls of the security system, she’ll have no problem slipping into the joint and lining her pockets with a little extra cash or whatever she can find in the safety deposit box. Have her show her claws for the picture, and she can smile or look serious—either way this picture is going to be one to remember!

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Superman will always be a classic superhero costume, but this cool update based on last year's hit film is worth sporting. This printed fiber-filled jumpsuit has a good sheen on it to look extra slick in your Halloween Instagrams, and it comes with 3D-printed boot tops to complete the look. Our favorite part is the Velcro cape, which you can remove if it starts to be a pest when running around town party-hopping.  
As noted earlier, patriotic-themed heroes were hot in the early 1940s. America was going through a strange period of both isolationism and nationalism at the same time. Americans were really proud of their country, but also didn't want to get involved in the war in Europe. Patriotic-themed heroes captured that feel, by having noble American heroes defeat villains who dared to come over here to mess with us. Things got bolder, though, when Timely Comics introduced Captain America, who broke out of the isolationist viewpoints by having the lead character punch out Adolf Hitler on the cover of the first issue, a full year before the United States actually went to war with Nazi Germany!
The red and blue webbed costume that Ditko came out was one of the most unusual superhero costumes ever designed, but despite it not really looking all that much like a spider, it really did fit the character well. Although artists sometimes differed on whether to give him webbing under the arms and artists like Todd McFarlane have certainly differed with how big the eyes on his mask are, the basic costume design has remained the same for over 50 years.

Created by Brian Pulido as a fantasy of Evil Ernie in “Evil Ernie” #1, Lady Death has evolved over the years into a much more nuanced character. She went on to gain popularity due to her over-the-top sexuality. Now, this isn’t to say that the character is a joke and shouldn’t be treated seriously. If she weren’t an interesting character, then she wouldn’t have survived over 25 years in comics. However, that being said, she is still known for her looks above anything else. The moral of the story is to go out and buy some Lady Death books and learn a couple facts!


It is hard to get even one costume on a list like this, but somehow, Spider-Man managed to show up on this list twice! It all started when a fan named Randy Schueller thought it would be a cool idea if Spider-Man had an alternate costume that he could wear. He wrote in to Marvel with the idea and, since this was back in a day when Marvel still accepted submission ideas from the public, Jim Shooter bought the idea from Randy for a little over $200. Tom DeFalco then worked with Randy for a bit on trying to turn the idea into a Spider-Man issue but it never quite came together. A couple of years later, Shooter was trying to think of major changes to be made in Marvel's Secret Wars event and he thought back to the black costume idea.

This is a tricky one, since Iron Man has technically gone through a number of different designs over the years, as the outfit is always evolving. It is difficult to pinpoint precisely which armor is the best, so we have decided to pull back a bit and note that the more general "yellow and gold" design is what we're going to celebrate here. You see, when Iron Man first debuted, he wore what looked to just be a suit of big, bulky, gray iron. When he became a regular superhero, Marvel tried to fix that design flaw by literally just spray-painting the armor gold. "Oh no, he's hideous!" "Oh, never mind. He's spray-painted gold. It looks great now!" Then Steve Ditko designed a new armor that worked red into the design and it really clicked.
Comic book artists quite often have the same sort of elements pop up in their costume designs. Jim Lee, for instance, is well known for how much he likes to use collars, either high collars or chokers. One of the all-time great costume designers, Dave Cockrum, used so many sashes on his costume designs that he even ended up drawing a cartoon mocking his own overuse of sashes by having a few of his characters pointing out the similarity in their costumes.

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