Superman soon had lots of company and lots of competition! What do they have in common? All superheroes have some type of extraordinary power or ability. Their "superpower" can be something they're born with: Superman, Wonder Woman, Thor. It can be the result of an accident or mutation: Spider-Man, The Incredible Hulk, Wolverine. Or, it can be simply a skill they have learned, honed and perfected beyond the average: Batman, Hawkeye. They all have a strong moral code and a motivation to rid the world of some menace.  
So many people love Beyoncé that her appearance, performance, and subsequent announcement that she was pregnant during the 2011 MTV Video Music Awards attracted 12.4 million viewers, making it the most-watched broadcast on MTV since its inception. In addition, her announcement on Instagram this February that she and Jay Z are expecting twins gained 6,335,571 "likes" in just eight hours, breaking the record for the most liked image on Instagram.

And that's saying nothing of the show's villains. Even with Cesar Romero's ubiquitous mustache, you'd be harder pressed to find a more colorful cadre of costumed crooks that so gleefully and shamelessly embodied the campy, all-for-fun spirit of their medium. the 1966 Batman was, in many ways, like a comic ouroboros, with Batman's printed adventures and his television capers influencing each other in equal measure. All of this came full circle when DC Digital launched Batman '66, putting the show's highly stylized aesthetic under the pen of artists like Mike Allred and Ted Naifeh, and proving its enduring value in the process.
While the X-Men's film uniforms may largely be a snooze, Hugh Jackman's Wolverine is about as dead on as Logan could appear on film. Sure, he donned the same plain black leather as everyone else, but before that, Jackman captured Wolverine's logic defying hair, his old-man sideburns, and even his sneer in a way that comic fans could only dream about.
But some female heroes haven’t been so lucky as to get more practical makeovers. Take for example Elizabeth Olsen's cleavage-baring Avengers: Infinity War look, which Olsen says isn't exactly her personal cup of tea for a character wading into battle with Mad Titans. Even she'll admit it's a step up from Wanda's comic book look, but in her words costumes like hers aren't "representing the average woman."

The 1960s Batman TV series helped to identify the fact that a black leather outfit was her best look, but that did not last too long in the comics themselves. Her most famous costume for years was a tight purple outfit designed by Jim Balent. The late, great Darwyn Cooke, however, came up with this brilliant mixture of a functional,black leather outfit that she wore on the Batman TV series and the film, Batman Returns. The use of the goggle mask was also a great touch. Jim Lee was wary of changing looks during his "Hush" series on Batman, but he adopted the Cooke Catwoman design entirely, that's how good it was.


While Jon Favreau's first Iron Man film explored the evolution of Iron Man's armor from his first spot-welded, cave-cobbled bulky behemoth to the more streamlined look that would become the standard platform moving forward, and his sequel, Iron Man 2 brought in the gun-laden War Machine and a subtle take on the fan-favorite Silver Centurion armor, Iron Man 3 truly opened the floodgates, showcasing page-accurate renditions of everything from Iron Man's stealth armor, to a more faithful adaptation of the aforementioned Silver Centurion armor, and even Rhodey taking the helm of the star-spangled Iron Patriot armor.
As noted earlier, patriotic-themed heroes were hot in the early 1940s. America was going through a strange period of both isolationism and nationalism at the same time. Americans were really proud of their country, but also didn't want to get involved in the war in Europe. Patriotic-themed heroes captured that feel, by having noble American heroes defeat villains who dared to come over here to mess with us. Things got bolder, though, when Timely Comics introduced Captain America, who broke out of the isolationist viewpoints by having the lead character punch out Adolf Hitler on the cover of the first issue, a full year before the United States actually went to war with Nazi Germany!

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