The most famous storyline featuring Namor is actually an ongoing story with the Invisible Woman, Sue Richards. Dating back to some of his earliest appearances in the Silver Age, he has been the bad boy that Sue Richards has been drawn to but can never have. His good looks and anti-hero nature make him a very desirable character. Considering most people know him for his revealing costume, and his pseudo-love affair with Sue Richards, it's easy to see how Namor lands on this list.

The costumes and designs for our favorite heroes have changed throughout the years, and while many modern versions of heroes are the best looking of the character, there are some that they just got right from the beginning. There are some that are improved though, and other heroes have so many different costumes, it’s difficult to pick which is the best.
Pick a random issue of “Witchblade” prior to the last year or so of its run and you’d be hard-pressed to find a cover that didn’t feature the main character sexualized. Obviously, the biggest reason for the sexual nature of the covers is the fact that the character’s costume is basically the most unrealistic armor ever seen. Basically just enough armor to cover her arm, her nipples and only the bare minimum below the belt, Sara Pezzini’s costume is pretty ridiculous. It’s no surprise when most people would define the character based on her appearance than on her actual heroics.

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Many people claim Megan Fox gets movie roles only because she's hot, a conclusion which might not necessarily be true. We have seen her acting in movies such as Transformers, Jennifer's Body, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and in other franchises, and she is okay. However, we can never have an argument about whether she's hot or not, because she is undoubtedly one of the hottest women in Hollywood today.

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Debuting in “Cry for Dawn” #1 way back in 1989, the character has only show up sporadically throughout the decades. However, when people think of the hottest female characters in comics, she’ll always rank highly. She is so defined by her looks that Dragon Con held a Dawn look-a-like contest from 1998 to 2010, even when the character wasn’t seen in any recent comic books. Now, don’t think that we are somehow saying that the character isn’t a great character because her looks are so important, but rather that the iconic design by Linsner has allowed the character to live on through the years based on looks alone.

As we noted in the introduction, when Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster sat down to come up with the very first superhero costume, it is not that they did not have any influences to work with. In fact, it is quite evident that their super-strong hero's initial costume was modeled after the outfit that a circus strongman would wear. However, beyond the powerful primary colors used for the costume -- the blue in Superman's costume is literally the darkest shade of the traditional blue used for comic book coloring -- the costume also evoked a sense of wonder that was so unusual in comics of the time.
Mystique is one of the most impressive characters in X-Men lore. Hardly is there any other character in DC or Marvel who can match up to her shape-shifting abilities. All mutants in the X-Men movies, cartoons, and publications are special, and although we have labeled Magneto's mutants as the villains, we can all accept that their actions are as a result of human hostility towards them.
That said, like some other cliches, the sashes kept being used because they really do work. When Chris Claremont and Dave Cockrum took over X-Men, one of their goals was to revamp Marvel Girl, Jean Grey, and make her a bigger character. One of the ways they were going to do this was to give her a new costume and a new codename to replace the outdated "Marvel Girl" one. Cockrum went through a wide variety of looks for Jean before coming up with this excellent costume that also worked well when John Byrne changed the color scheme to make her Dark Phoenix. Cockrum's design for Ms. Marvel deserves a note here. It didn't make the list as it was a bit too skimpy of a costume, but otherwise, it was a great look (and of course, it also had a sash).
Dress up like the warrior princess that you are! You’ll be the prettiest princess at the Halloween party when you show off your fighting skills and keep everyone safe from whatever tragedy is bound to strike! When the world needs a hero, you’ll be the first to rise to the occasion. Top off your superhero princess look with a signature Wonder Woman tiara, and you’ll be set for battle!
Dejah Thoris originally appeared all the way back in 1917 as the princess of the Martian city-state/empire of Helium in Edgar Rice Burroughs's series of Martian novels (the same source that introduced the more well-known John Carter (that guy who got a movie to himself in 2012) - the man who happens to be her husband). Since then, she has appeared in a number of comic books, most notably in Dynamite Entertainment's 2010-11 comic miniseries Warlord of Mars.
Depending on when you read this article, you might be waiting to watch the Wonder Woman film, or you may have just watched it, and therefore you know how amazing this woman is. Adrianne Curry is wearing Wonder Woman's traditional costume here and, because she is a gorgeous woman, her representation is amazing. Curry is a model, famous for winning the first series of America's Next Top Model.
Everyone loves a crime-fighting superhero (and a good supervillain; think Mysterio). So why not dress as one for your next Halloween get-together? Relive your childhood memories by sporting one of these costume ideas. Bonus: they also make for perfect Instagram bait. From Marvel to DC Comics and everything in between, here are some of the best adult superhero costumes on the market now.
Superman will always be a classic superhero costume, but this cool update based on last year's hit film is worth sporting. This printed fiber-filled jumpsuit has a good sheen on it to look extra slick in your Halloween Instagrams, and it comes with 3D-printed boot tops to complete the look. Our favorite part is the Velcro cape, which you can remove if it starts to be a pest when running around town party-hopping.  

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Debuting in “Cry for Dawn” #1 way back in 1989, the character has only show up sporadically throughout the decades. However, when people think of the hottest female characters in comics, she’ll always rank highly. She is so defined by her looks that Dragon Con held a Dawn look-a-like contest from 1998 to 2010, even when the character wasn’t seen in any recent comic books. Now, don’t think that we are somehow saying that the character isn’t a great character because her looks are so important, but rather that the iconic design by Linsner has allowed the character to live on through the years based on looks alone.
The tech that brought Leonardo, Donatello, Michelangelo, and Raphael to life in 1990 may be outdated at this point, but at the time, the palpable, textured look of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles was downright groundbreaking. It says a lot that even almost 25 years later, the visuals of that film still hold up, and that four mutant turtles could look even sort of natural juxtaposed with the grimy, gritty set-pieces of New York's sewers and colorful, highly fictional criminal circuses.

Disappointed by Season 2, didn't grip me as much as Season 1, think it tried to do too much and should have focused on the bread and butter, with episode 9 finally getting to the kind of pace the entire series really lacked. The subplot was extremely uninteresting for me because it paled in comparison to what they could be focusing on. In some respects I felt it was an opportunity missed, was looking at my watch too much unfortunately through several episodes. Casting definitely a strong quality as well as the look of the drama, a lot of effort put in there.

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And that's saying nothing of the show's villains. Even with Cesar Romero's ubiquitous mustache, you'd be harder pressed to find a more colorful cadre of costumed crooks that so gleefully and shamelessly embodied the campy, all-for-fun spirit of their medium. the 1966 Batman was, in many ways, like a comic ouroboros, with Batman's printed adventures and his television capers influencing each other in equal measure. All of this came full circle when DC Digital launched Batman '66, putting the show's highly stylized aesthetic under the pen of artists like Mike Allred and Ted Naifeh, and proving its enduring value in the process.

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In the late 1960s, Marvel wanted to make sure it got control of the name "Captain Marvel" for trademark purposes, so Stan Lee and Gene Colan quickly came up with a character to go with the name. For the costume, creators had him wear a literal Kree captain's uniform, which in this case was a green and white outfit with a little flair to it. It was a decent enough costume for a rank and file character, but it was a weak design for a superhero. Unsurprisingly, the Captain Marvel series was a hard sell for Marvel. Marvel needed to keep it going, though, so the company brought in Roy Thomas and Gil Kane to revamp the series.

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Characters like Tony Stark and Diana Prince are more than just good looks, however. When you read the adventures of Captain America, you don’t think about how sexy Steve Rogers is. Well, maybe you do, but that’s not all you care about. Unfortunately, for some characters, their appearance trumps most everything else about them. Let’s take a look at eight male and eight female characters in comics who are viewed as being more “hot” than “hero.”

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Many people claim Megan Fox gets movie roles only because she's hot, a conclusion which might not necessarily be true. We have seen her acting in movies such as Transformers, Jennifer's Body, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and in other franchises, and she is okay. However, we can never have an argument about whether she's hot or not, because she is undoubtedly one of the hottest women in Hollywood today.
Just what is a superhero? Before 1917, there was no such thing; or, at any rate, there was no such word. But there have always been heroes, and some of them have had extraordinary powers or abilities. Ancient mythology has tales of Hercules, Perseus, and Gilgamesh. Medieval folklore has Robin Hood, Beowulf and the knights of King Arthur's Round Table. Then came swashbuckling tales such as The Three Musketeers. The common thread was that the main characters battled against the forces of evil. The evil could take the form of monsters, corrupt or criminal humans, or forces of nature.  
When the Silver Age began, there were two particular types of characters who were seen as really cool that no longer get treated the same way in popular fiction -- scientists and test pilots. Scientists were the heroes of every other science fiction comic book from DC and Marvel in the 1950s and 1960s. Reed Richards being a cool scientist was a totally normal thing at the time. Similarly, test pilot Chuck Yeager was one of the most admired heroes in the United States in the 1950s due to his skills as a test pilot. You need to keep those things in mind when you realize how modeling Hal Jordan after guys like Yeager defined the character so much in the late 1950s.
This is a tricky one, since Iron Man has technically gone through a number of different designs over the years, as the outfit is always evolving. It is difficult to pinpoint precisely which armor is the best, so we have decided to pull back a bit and note that the more general "yellow and gold" design is what we're going to celebrate here. You see, when Iron Man first debuted, he wore what looked to just be a suit of big, bulky, gray iron. When he became a regular superhero, Marvel tried to fix that design flaw by literally just spray-painting the armor gold. "Oh no, he's hideous!" "Oh, never mind. He's spray-painted gold. It looks great now!" Then Steve Ditko designed a new armor that worked red into the design and it really clicked.

It’s a good thing Wonder Woman is here to watch the little ones, because we’re not sure The Riddler is going to best the best guardian over the young superheroes in training. Batman, Robin , and Catwoman can team up to hit the neighborhood in search of the best treats, but while The Riddler is busy trying to vex the neighbors with tricks and riddles, Wonder Woman can provide a watchful eye over her superheroes in training. When it comes to taking the yearly photo of the group, just let each member bust out their signature moves. Batman and Robin can look like stoic Gotham City residents, even while Catwoman throws her claws up in anticipation of a brand new heist. The Riddler is sure to be laughing, but as for Wonder Woman? Well, she’s the one that holds the group together. (Be it with her motherly instincts or just by keeping the Golden Lasso of Truth handy!)

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Dejah Thoris originally appeared all the way back in 1917 as the princess of the Martian city-state/empire of Helium in Edgar Rice Burroughs's series of Martian novels (the same source that introduced the more well-known John Carter (that guy who got a movie to himself in 2012) - the man who happens to be her husband). Since then, she has appeared in a number of comic books, most notably in Dynamite Entertainment's 2010-11 comic miniseries Warlord of Mars.


The former former fashion model and actress, Rebecca Alie Romijn, best known for her role as Mystique in the X-Men films, and for her recurring role as Alexis Meade on the television series Ugly Betty. In 2000’s X-Men Romijn had her first major movie role as Mystique; she returned to the role in 2003’s sequel X2: X-Men United, and again for X-Men: The Last Stand (2006). In these movies her costume consisted of blue wakeup and some strategically placed prosthetics on her otherwise nude body. In X2: X-Men United she shows up in a bar in one scene in her “normal” look, and also in X-Men: The Last Stand, she appears as a dark-haired “de-powered” Mystique.

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